September 4, 2008

red butterfly

I am reading Red Butterfly (by Deborah Noyes) to my daughter, Mila. The book tells the story of a Chinese princess who smuggles the secret of silk out of China. Mila is interested in the pictures, of course: the girl’s long black hair, her red slippers, the sparrows pecking mud along the road to the summer palace, the court musician plucking her pipa, the graceful coppery fish in the garden pool. But the story is about silk and about the little girl who wants to take a piece of home away with her on her bridal journey, even though it is forbidden. Much of this is beyond my own little girl’s comprehension…what does arranged marriage mean to a preschooler in the American Midwest, after all? But I want her to understand at least a little of what the story is about. I want her to understand why the girl speaks of silk as a splendor, as woven wind, why she longs to take its secret away with her on her long road from home.

I put the book down and tell Mila to wait for just a moment. In my closet I have a silk skirt. It’s not really Chinese, but it is silk. And it possesses just enough of that splendor, that woven windiness the princess describes, to do the trick. I set it in Mila’s lap and she oohs and ahs as she fingers the soft fabric. She has been curled up on the couch with a polyester fleece blanket that, for some reason, she’d become inseparable from earlier in the day. She goes from fingering the silk to rubbing it across her arms. Clearly, she is enjoying the sensation. Her expression is beatific. All at once she pulls away the fleece blanket, disdain evident in her gesture, “can you take this off, please?!” And, when the offending polyester has been removed, she spreads the silk over her bare legs, burying her hands in its whisper soft folds. Serenely, almost royally, she asks to continue reading the story. And I do. And I think, this time, “woven wind” and “swirls of silk” and “windy silken promises” actually mean something to her. I think she understands that little Chinese princess better than she did before.

After all, I cannot understand the world myself simply by reading about it. I must taste and see and feel and listen. As we all must. Mila is no different. It is not enough to simply tell her a story or teach her a lesson. I must share with her the warm spices at our favorite Indian restaurant, dance with her to the lilting traditional French songs on her favorite CD. I must let her find illumination in the woven whisper of silk against her own bare skin. If I want her to learn and to love, I must help her to experience. As we read to the end of Red Butterfly, I am already storing away ideas in the back of my mind, thinking about the books we’ve read and the conversations we’ve had and about how I might bring bits of those ideas to life for her in a whole new way.

Comments

  1. Heather says:

    This is beautiful!

  2. Sherry says:

    What a beautiful way to bring the story to life for Mila!

  3. Virginia Spurlock says:

    How wonderful to illustrate the unknown in such a simple way!

  4. Cara says:

    I can see and feel the silk (and polyester!) when I read this. Music, texture, and taste are such wonderful things to introduce our kids to!

  5. Sandy says:

    What a wonderful way to bring stories and other cultures to life for a little one. It gave me shivers!

  6. Kirk says:

    What a great story! This is such a great way to establish the mind of our children beyond our common mental and physical provincial borders.

  7. Emily says:

    I love the way you brought the story even more to life for Mila and for me too! It makes me want to go put on the silk robe I have.

  8. Jennifer says:

    What a creative way to share a story involving the senses. This illustration was touching and something I would like to experience as I read stories to my own daughter.

  9. Mary Johnson says:

    You are a very talented Mom in more than one way. You did a beautiful job in your your writing. Good luck.

  10. Brad Kidder says:

    I loved this post! Thanks for writing it!

  11. Vanessa says:

    Your posting is wonderful! You truely have a gift for the written language and have offered Mila the opportunity to explore and learn in multi-dimentional way! I look forward to future postings as they very enjoyable to read!

  12. Tamama says:

    What a wonderful way to introduce your child to the world at such a young, impressionable age.