Author Archives: Tea Collection

About Tea Collection

Jessie tweets & chats her days away working in the social media and public relations departments of Tea. Born and raised in Austin, Texas, Jessie moved to New York after college to work in the fashion industry. Still new to San Francisco, she's constantly discovering new sushi spots and hidden boutiques. She's still dreaming of her last trip to the Caribbean and hopes one day soon she can play on the beaches of Thailand.

January 20, 2015

Passport to Angelique Kids

Each month Studio T  features one of our retailers. This month we caught up with Jennifer, co-founder of Angelique Baby + Kids. Learn about the brand and the hot spots of New Orleans below!

Angelique Kids

Have you always lived in New Orleans?
I was born in Birmingham, Alabama. I have been in my wonderful New Orleans since 1996. My business partner, Angelique Palumbo is New Orleans born and raised.

How was your business born?
We opened in 2006, post Katrina. We are looking forward to our 10 year birthday!

Tell us a little about your family history.
I brought some of my deep traditional Alabama ideas of children’s wear to New Orleans. Like my electric city of New Orleans, the store has evolved to a more sophisticated and worldly scope. continue reading

January 12, 2015

A Gift from Gaonli Village

I’m not sure what I was expecting, really.

Perhaps small groups of girls quietly sewing or studying or shyly showing us their homemade handicrafts. Something simple. Something that would be easy to describe with a few well-chosen adjectives.

Instead, I found myself holding a bemused baby goat and thanking a smiling 14-year-old girl for her gift while trying to explain through a translator that there was no way I could get a goat through customs.

It was a Saturday in Jaipur and my Tea colleague Jessie and I were spending the day visiting villages with Gram Bharati Samiti, a non-profit funded by the Global Fund for Children. In Hindi, the name means “Society for Rural Development.”

Early that morning, we met the Gram Bharati Samiti founder, Bhawani, at his office near Amer Fort. A sixty-something man with sharp eyes and sparse hair, Bhawani welcomed us with a gentle greeting and masala chai. He introduced us to Kusum, a quiet woman in her fifties who has worked with Bhawani for 25 years. (Kusum has one of those smiles that makes you feel like everything is going to be ok.)

Bhawani explained that he and Kusum would take us to visit three of the 17 villages they’ve been working with—teaching them about safe drinking water, about healthcare and women’s rights and the power of education.

After an hour or more of jouncing down increasingly narrow roads, dodging cows, camels and overloaded motorbikes, our van pulled into the middle of Gaonli village and I sat and stared in open-mouthed astonishment.

There, in a dusty clearing between equally dusty mud dwellings, stood a huge tent teetering on bamboo poles. And beneath it, a rainbow of pink and yellow and purple saris.

IMG_3149

A crowd of villagers, mostly women and girls, all turned to stare as we awkwardly climbed out of the van and then, as Jessie and I pressed our palms together and murmured, “Namaste. Namaste,” they all began to smile and laugh and bob their heads in greeting. They had been waiting for us.

We were led to the front of the tent and seated on folding chairs facing everyone as Sarita, another GBS staff member, picked up a microphone and began to introduce us.

We found out later that the sound system was powered by a generator that had been trucked in on the back of a motorcycle. Gaonli has no electricity or running water. The people who live there walk nearly two miles each morning to pump their water from a well. (Yet later, at every door we passed, someone came out to greet us holding dripping glasses of water for our refreshment.)

Dressed in their best and visibly nervous, several teenage girls put on a Rajasthani dance demonstration, one after another after another gracefully bobbing and twirling in front of us, anklets jingling. continue reading

January 6, 2015

Prints & Patterns

india

We were thrilled to see bold print and pattern mixing everywhere we went in India. The brightly colored clothing (everything from saris to pavadas!) truly lit up the earth toned streets. Our newest prints give little citizens the freedom to mix and match as they please. continue reading

January 2, 2015

Busy Streets of India

India

Fearlessness. A characteristic one must possess to drive on the roads of India. On the streets you will find all types of vehicles… rickshaws, bikes, trucks, buses, cars, SUVs, three-wheelers, tractors, bullock carts — even all types of non-vehicles… people, cows, goats, dogs. With no real lanes and various speed limits, you quickly realize that your horn is the most important asset! continue reading

January 1, 2015

Decorate Your Mandala

Mandala means “circle” in Sanskrit and is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the Universe. It has been said that creating mandalas helps stabilize, integrate and re-order inner life.

We designed this mandala in hopes that you and your little citizens will decorate it over and over again. In India, mandalas are made of many different types of objects. We’ve gathered household items to create a few different types mandalas ourselves!

What will you come up with? Share it with us using #MakeAMandala on Instagram.

Fruit Mandala

 First up, fruit! continue reading

December 31, 2014

The Art of Kantha Embroidery

kantha quilt

Kantha is a type of Bengali embroidered quilt. The kantha quilts of Bengal are created from fragments of old family garments layered on top of each other. Each kantha tells a story through technique, design and patterns. Women’s voices are heard through the mends, patches and stitches in this living tradition.  continue reading

December 16, 2014

Em’s Go-To Souvenir

Emily Meyer

My love of collecting teapots started long before I founded Tea Collection. I believe it was China or Hong Kong where I first picked up my first international teapot. I also remember buying beautiful bowls in Japan that actually turned out to be teacups! My love for collecting these items started then. I have always loved the drink and cherished the moment and feeling of the warming experience. Teapots evoke just the right sense of elegance and wisdom that I admire about the whole pastime. And I love the exotic memories each one gives me when I look at it or use it. continue reading

December 9, 2014

Molasses Roll Out Cookies

Catherine McCord of Weelicious

I can imagine if you asked grown ups their favorite childhood holiday memory, most would say baking and decorating cookies. Every year my mother would make a big batch of gingerbread and sugar cookie dough for my brother, my cousin and I to roll out and decorate.

There would be bottle after bottle of red, white and green crystals, sanding sugars and little silver balls that looked just like holiday ornaments. The only time we were quiet was when we were all decorating our cookies with precision and care. My mom would then pop them into the oven to bake until just golden, while we sipped on hot cocoa before returning to the table to cover the cookies with icing and frosting in an array of colors.  continue reading