Author Archives: Tea Collection

About Tea Collection

Katy designs graphics and textiles for Tea and is a self-proclaimed wildlife conservationist. She loves discovering beautiful things and finding inspiration in unexpected places. When she is not working on one of her too many creative projects she enjoys rollerblading to musicals, pretending she can surf and watching Disney movies. Katy has traveled around the globe to work with creatures that have lost their homes to rainforest destruction. Her most memorable trip was to Malaysian Borneo working with orphaned orangutans, next up is sloths in Costa Rica, and hopefully one day Mountain Gorillas in Uganda.

August 6, 2010

Weekend Activity: Little Drifters

Recently art blog BOOOOOOOM! and the Vancouver Sun teamed up on the Little Drifters project.   While they are no longer taking submissions it’s still a fabulous fun activity for the whole family.   Build a little boat using nothing but natural materials, sail it on some water and enjoy!
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See all Little Drifter submissions here.
See full set of directions on BOOOOOOOM!

July 31, 2010

Pink Blue Project

PinkBlueProject

Pink Blue Project by Korean photographer JeongMee Yoon.

When his young daughter only wanted to wear pink, Korean photographer JeongMee Yoon decided to explore the connection between consumerism and color preference. How much are girls and boys influenced with their color preferences by what’s available to them? Seemingly a lot. It just reminds us to to notice and make thoughtful choices whenever we can. As designers, brands, people, companies, parents.

Be sure to check out more amazing photographs and projects on his website.

found on LMNOP

July 12, 2010

Károly Reich

When Laura and Emily brought back the below postcards from their inspiration trip to Old World Hungary, they could barely keep them away from me.  I was ready to start designing graphics immediately.

ReichKarolyWoodcut
postcards of Károly’s Reich linocuts from Tea’s inspiration trip

I saw on the back of the cards that they were by Károly Reich, a Hungarian artist and children’s book illustrator.   I couldn’t wait to see more of his work.   Most of his work is in watercolor or gouache, which I found even more charming than his linocut pieces.  The more I found, the more obsessed I became.  I searched the internet for days trying to find every last piece of his artwork.  I was image searching google.hu.   I found myself on a random assortment of Japanese book sites that collected his work.

ReichKarolyIllustrations
just a few of Károly Reich’s watercolor/gouache children’s book illustrations

I managed to get my hands on two of his books.  I got lucky with an Amazon used book search.   Matt the Gooseherd a Hungarian story told in English.  I love the idea of sharing a Hungarian tale for an English audience, I think its a great way for children to learn about new cultures.   Let’s See the Animals teaches children about a variety of woodland creatures, most of which live both in Hungary and North America.  AND! It’s illustrated in crayon!  Crayon!?  A real, respected artist who uses crayon!  I was smitten.  I was ready to design our entire line as a tribute to this man.  While the rest of the team didn’t really go for that idea, there are a few pieces that are inspired by his work (see below).

TeaCollectionsTeesInspiredByKaroly
Tea’s tops inspired by
Károly Reich‘s illustrations
left:  Folk Tale Graphic Top
right:  Knights Layered Sleeves Tee

LetsSeeTheAnimalsReichKaroly

Let’s See The Animals and Matt the Gooseherd covers

And if anyone out there knows how to get their hands on this Reich Károly collective book, let me know – I’m still searching for it!

fun fact: I was having a hard time determining if his name was Károly Reich or Reich Károly.  It seemed to be listed differently on different books.  I asked my aunt, a librarian, which she thought was correct.    Turns out that in Hungarian names are written backwards according to the Western way of writing names.  They are apparently the only country that does this.