Author Archives: nuala

About nuala

Nuala Sawyer works in Social Marketing at Tea. She enjoys bicycling, cooking with New Mexican green chiles, animals, and running through Golden Gate Park. She grew up mostly in New Mexico and Colorado, but has also lived in Belgium, England, Wales, Greece, The Democratic Republic of Congo, and now San Francisco. She has a degree in photography from Hampshire College. A few life goals include visiting the Dalmatian Coast in Croatia, biking from San Francisco to Los Angeles, owning a dog, and perfecting the art of soufflé.

January 25, 2011

A New Twist on Tea

We’re always looking for new ways to style Tea. This season a few of Tea’s employees found inspiration in some of our Catalonia-inspired kid’s items, and found a whole new style for these pieces:

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Michelle (above), who works in Graphic Design for Tea, is rocking the girl’s Picasso Bowtie Shirt in size 12. The shirt ran a little short, so she layered an H&M camisole underneath. Jeans are by RVCA, Cardigan is Madewell.

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Isabelle (above) does Product Development for Tea, and is sporting the boy’s Picasso Stripe Sweater in size 12. Her scarf is from Nordstrom, and her short boots are by Rachel Comey.

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What’s your favorite way to style Tea?

 

January 17, 2011

Random Acts of Inspiration: Julie Morstad

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If this is your first introduction to the work of Julie Morstad, you’re in for a treat. An illustrator and artist, Julie’s work often features children and animals.

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We love her use of colors and textures! Do the dancing girls above remind you of any of the pieces from our recent Fall Collection? (Hint: here, here and here.)

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You can see more of Julie’s work on her website, and shop for prints of her artwork at her online shop.

January 12, 2011

Be Prepared for Art-Making!

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1.) Indigo Stripe Tee 2.) To Be an Artist 3.) Painters Overalls 4.) Bandana Set 5.) El Artista Shirt 6.) Paint Splattered Jeans

There’s nothing like dressing for the part in comfy and casual Tea clothes when making and creating. This season we’re celebrating everyone’s inner artist. We compiled some of our favorite art-inspired and art-friendly pieces above to get you started.

As for art projects, the sky is the limit! We listed some of our favorite kid-friendly DIY projects below.

Garden Projects

Potted Plants and Chalkboard Paint

Miniature Tin Gardens

Paper

Cardboard Stampede

Calder Mobiles

Paper Lanterns

Paper Bag Puppets

Paint

Painted Umbrellas

Big Canvases

Fabric

Make your own Pom Poms

Stamping Fabric Textiles

 

For a quick art fix, print out our Coloring Book Pages of Tea Collection graphics!

December 31, 2010

A Global New Year

We have our own New Year’s traditions in the USA. In almost every major city there is a grand firework display. People gather around their TVs to watch the ball drop in Times Square, and champagne is the drink of choice. We have hats and glasses, noisemakers and confetti. In many parts of the USA eating black eyed peas is rumored to bring you good luck, and they’re often served with collard greens and pork or ham. We make resolutions for the New Year, and kiss each other at midnight.

But what are other countries’ traditions around this date?

Japan

At midnight on January 1st, Buddhist temples across Japan ring their bells 108 times, to ward off the 108 sins in Buddhist belief. Traditional food on this date is a dish of seaweed, fish cakes, mashed sweet potato, burdock root, and sweetened black soybeans, called osechi, as well as kagami mochi, which are rice cakes topped with oranges. Postcards are sent to friends and family celebrating the New Year, and haiku poetry is celebrated with themes of new beginnings.

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Mexico

In Mexico it’s traditional to eat 12 grapes at the chimes of midnight, making a wish with each one. Houses are decorated in the color red, and wishes are made for the New Year. In Mexico City the New Year celebrations occur in Zocalo, which is the main large plaza of the city.

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Finland

In Finland there is an old New Year’s eve tradition that involves dropping hot pieces of tin into cold buckets of water. The shape that they assume can be interpreted as indications of the New Year. Different shapes have different meaning, signifying wealth, happiness, sickness,  sorrow, and love.

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Scotland

Scotland has a New Year’s Eve tradition referred to as “first-footing”. The first-footer is the first person to cross the threshold and enter a house in the New Year. Signifying a bearer of good luck, the first footer (often young and dark-haired) carries with them a coin, bread, salt, whisky, or coal, depending on what the family is wishing for in the New year.

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Panama

Panama celebrates the New Year by the burning of Muñecos, effigies of celebrities or politicians during bonfire parties. Contests are held as to who has the best muñeco.  The burning of muñecos is believed to fight off evil spirits in preparation for a new year.

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Let’s say Happy New Year! in:

Gleðilegt nýtt ár! (Icelandic)

Bonne Annee!  (French)

Feliz Ano-Nuevo! (Spanish)

Blwyddyn Newydd Dda! (Welsh)

Gelillog Nieuwjaar! (Dutch)

Sretna Nova Godina (Croatian)

Sawadee Pee Mai (Thai)

And from all of us at Tea – Best Wishes for a very happy New Year!