Category: Activities

Holi Festival Giveaway

We’ve teamed up with papaya+post to bring you a Holi festival giveaway fit for a party! As we kick-off the giveaway, we’ve asked Mugdha and Avni, the brilliant ladies behind the brand, to help explain the history of Holi and share their favorite ways to celebrate the colorful festival.

papaya+post At papaya+post we believe in “Traditional, with a Twist”. Basically celebrating the world’s festivals in a way that respects age-old roots but that adapts them to our modern lives. Holi, the Indian festival of color, is one of our very favorites. 

DIY Baby Blanket Embroidery Tutorial

DIY EmbroideryIn the Bengali region of India, it is a tradition for a grandmother to make each of their grandchildren a kantha quilt. The quilt is made out of three layers of fabric most commonly, strips of worn sari’s because the material is super soft against the babies’ skin and perfect for nap time or cuddling. The tradition of the kantha quilt is a way of connecting with family, even after the grandparents are gone. It is such an important tradition that the grandmother’s will make extra kantha quilts so that if she passes away before all of her grandchildren are born, they will still have a quilt. 

DIY Okra Woodblocking

okra

Okra is a popular green vegetable in India as well as southern regions of the United States. There are many delicious Indian dishes that incorporate okra, the most popular being Bhindi (okra) Masala. While being nutritious, it just so happens that okra also makes a great homemade woodblock! Woodblocking is a popular technique for printing text, images or patterns with ink on fabrics and textiles in India. Indian woodblocking is typically done with a hand carved piece of wood. Here, we show you how you can use okra to make a DIY woodblocking card at home with your little citizens. 

Preschooler DIY: Embroider A Tea Design

DIY embroider lion

Embroider: to ornament with needlework or to form with needlework. 

Inspired by the embroidered details found throughout India, many of our graphics this season have a touch of embroidery on them. Our Kingfisher and Rohira Appliqué Graphic Tees for her and Hathi Graphic Tee for him are just a few of the embroidered designs you’ll find in our first delivery. Now we’re asking your little citizens to join in on the fun! 

Decorate Your Mandala

Mandala means “circle” in Sanskrit and is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the Universe. It has been said that creating mandalas helps stabilize, integrate and re-order inner life.

We designed this mandala in hopes that you and your little citizens will decorate it over and over again. In India, mandalas are made of many different types of objects. We’ve gathered household items to create a few different types mandalas ourselves!

What will you come up with? Share it with us using #MakeAMandala on Instagram.

Fruit Mandala

 First up, fruit!

How to Draw a Dragon

Over our travels, we have been inspired by dragon folklore and symbolism that is revered in many Asian cultures. Though their physical appearance may differ from country to country, the dragons legend is consistent throughout. They are the symbol of power, strength and good luck. Chinese dragons are also closely associated with water. They are said to reside in rivers, lakes and oceans. Ancient Korean folklore suggests that dragons are capable of speaking and understanding emotions such as kindness, devotion and gratitude. Japanese dragons are much like Chinese in appearance and are connected to Buddhism and thought to live in the ponds and lakes near temples.

During the celebrations for the Chinese New Year, which begins on February 19th, 2015, you will see many dragons, especially in parades where people dance with large dragon figures. Here is a craft activity to recreate a dragon, like the one shown in our Daring Dragon Double Decker Tee, that you can share with little citizens to help them explore the ancient Asian mythology.

What You’ll Need to Draw a Dragon:
-1 sheet of white paper
-colored pencils or crayons

Shibori Dye Technique DIY

We love learning different ways of designing textiles. We feel deeply connected to the ancient Japanese dye technique called Shibori. Shibori comes from the Japanese verb root shiboru, “to wring, squeeze, press.” Dyeing cloth with a Shibori technique requires folding, crumpling, stitching and twisting the cloth to create the design pattern you hope to achieve. What we all love about the Shibori technique (besides the lovely Tea favorite indigo hue!) is the mystery around the process – you never know what type of design you have made until it is done.  Learn how to make your own shibori dyed fabrics below!Indigo 4

What You’ll Need:
– An indigo dyeing kit like this one or indigo dye, wood blocks, rubber bands and rubber gloves
– T-shirts, cloth napkins, towels or any other fabric you wish to dye. Cotton responds best to dye.
– Two large containers, one for the dye, one for water.
– Newspaper or plastic to protect the surfaces around you