Category Archives: Global Dishes

April 14, 2014

Meskouta Recipe

Moroccan Cake Recipe

A traditional Moroccan cake is referred to as Meskouta in Arabic. Most often made with either orange juice or yogurt as the main ingredient, you’ll typically find them served plain with no frosting. The recipe will vary depending on which family you ask and while it’s most commonly baked in a bundt pan, this cake is much lighter than any other cake you’re used to seeing in this shape. We think this is the perfect desert to make with your little ones – only 10 minutes to prep and out of the oven 40 minutes later!

What You’ll Need:

4 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup fresh orange juice
zest from 2 oranges
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Or, you can go by these “Traditional Moroccan Measures” we came across when making this recipe…

4 eggs
1 level soup bowl of sugar
1 tea glass full of vegetable oil
1 heaping soup bowl of flour
2 sachets of baking powder
pinch of salt
1 tea glass of fresh orange juice
zest from 1 or 2 oranges
1 sachet of vanilla sugar

Prep:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 C). Grease and flour a bundt pan and set aside. Juice and zest fresh oranges. Beat together eggs and sugar. Gradually beat in oil. Stir in flour, baking powder, salt, and orange juice. Mix until smooth, adding the orange zest and vanilla.

Pour batter into the prepared pan. Bake for about 40 minutes or until top is brown and cake tests done (toothpick should come out clean). Allow cake to cool in the pan for about 10 minutes, then turn onto a rack to continue cooling.

 

March 12, 2014

Rghaif; A Moroccan Flat Bread

Moroccan Flat Bread

We’ve heard that three of the best Moroccan cities for street food are Fes, Marrakech and Essaouria (pronounced es-uh-weer-uh); coincidentally, we visited all three during our stay in Morocco. The best time to visit the food souks? Between 6 and 8 PM – this is the time Moroccans stroll and snack, before heading home for dinner around 10.

Rghaif is a flaky, layered flat bread that’s common throughout these souks. Although the dough may be stuffed with a variety of fillings before it’s folded and fried, plain rghaif are most popular served simply with honey or syrup made from butter. With only 4 ingredients, you can easily make this Moroccan flat bread at home!

What you’ll need:

1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup warm water
olive oil
white cheese (preferably a bit salty) – optional for filling

How to make:

Combine flour, yeast and salt into a large bowl. Add water slowly and knead mixture for 5-10 minutes until the dough is smooth.

Divide the dough into 5 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and lightly coat with olive oil, set aside for 10 minutes.

While your dough balls are resting, warm a cast iron skillet (or similarly heavy pan) to medium heat.

On a clean surface, roll each dough ball out as thin as you possibly can. Get started with a rolling pin and then carefully lift and stretch the dough by hand. The thinner, the better.

If you’d like to fill your flat bread, now is the time to do so! Once you’ve placed your filling in the center of the dough, fold the dough into a rectangle or square and place in the heated pan that’s been lightly coated with olive oil.

Cook for a total of 6 minutes, flipping the bread every minute or so – making sure each one is cooked evenly.

 

Best served warm with your favorite jelly or honey. Add a side of sliced meats and enjoy!

May 1, 2013

Celebrating Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo is a day for celebration! The fifth of May is the anniversary of the Mexican army’s unlikely victory in 1862 in the fight for independence from French forces. In honor of Cinco de Mayo, we’ve rounded up a few recipes and DIY’s for this year’s fiesta.

Tablescapes – Mix & match old vases with cigar boxes to create a unique tablescape. Add bright flowers and succulents to bring your table to life!

Embroidered Textiles – The art of embroidery dates back thousands of years. Today, the hand stitching can be found anywhere from cocktail dresses to cocktail napkins.

Paletas –  These pineapple and lime Mexican ice pops are sure to be a hit.

Piñata Crackers – This is a DIY your little ones won’t want to miss. Fill them with candy as set them out for your guests to takes as party favors.

Mexican Corn Salad – Bright, delicious, and easy to throw together!

Paper Garland – We were smitten with Lovely Indeed’s orange & pink flag garland. An easy DIY to liven up your fiesta.

Upcycled Vases – Rinse out your old  tin cans, fill them with sand & succulents (or fresh flowers!) to create new vases.

Piñata Sugar Cookies – Mini piñatas in the form of cookies? Yes, please!

[image source with links: Ruffled, Photobucket, Sweet Life, Poppy Haus, ValSoCal, Lovely Indeed, Inspired By This, SheKnows]