Category: Our Destinations

Meet Pepper, The Koala

pepper-kidWe met Pepper the koala at the Walkabout Wildlife Park, a wildlife sanctuary just north of Sydney, in Australia.  In person, koalas are just as cute and cuddly-looking as you might expect. They’re also veeeeeryslooooooow moooooooving. Koalas sleep for up to 18 hours a day—Pepper included.

From the Rainforest to the Reef

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Australia’s magical rainforests and reefs stretch across the country. From the Daintree Rainforest in Queensland to the Gondwanan Rainforest near Byron Bay, Australia is home to some of the oldest rainforests in the world. The Daintree Rainforest is the largest continuous area of tropical rainforest in Australia. Along the coast of Queensland, the rainforest grows right down to the edge of the sea! The rainforest is home to 90% of Australia’s population of bats and butterflies! You can also find frogs, reptiles, birds and an amazing variety of plants and flowers. Being on the coast, the Daintree rainforest offers a rare combination of scenery, from the dense tropical rainforest covering to the white sandy beaches of the shore.

Become a Penpal

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As the tradition of mail correspondence fades with each new generation, we’re making a stand. Let’s keep the tradition of sending letters alive! 

G’Day from Australia!

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Here at Tea, we want to give kids the world, to help them discover that no matter where we live or what our families look like, there is so much we all have in common.  We travel to discover. To dream. To explore the wonder of the world around us, across the globe and across the street. Since 2002, we’ve traveled the world, always inspired by the people we meet and the places we see. Wherever we go, from Bali to Norway, Morocco to Japan, we take in all we can and bring it back to our headquarters here in San Francisco to design globally-inspired clothing for all little citizens.

Wishes from Around the World

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In Japan, it’s tradition to write your prayers or wishes on small wooden plaques and place them outside the Shinto shrines around Japan. These wooden plaques are called ema. You may also see paper fortunes tied to tree branches. These are called omikuji. When we visited the shrines in Japan, we loved seeing all of ema plaques and omikuji fortunes hanging outside.We were so inspired by this tradition that we decided to share our wishes on Instagram using the #ShareMyWish. Learn more about the tradition of the ema and omikuji and scroll through our wishes!