September 8, 2010

Happy International Literacy Day!

colored bookshelf

Today is International Literacy Day! Created by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) in 1965, International Literacy Day’s goal is to emphasize and celebrate literacy around the world, for all individuals and in all communities. According to UN statistics almost 774 million adults throughout the world have at most only basic reading skills.

Many libraries and community centers around the country use this day as an opportunity to reach out for volunteers to tutor and assist adults and children in improving their reading skills (such as our local San Francisco Library). If you’re in New York City, check out today’s blog post about International Literacy Day, and see how you can get involved.

At Tea we celebrate reading through our Children’s Books. We donate the proceeds from their sale to the Global Fund for Children, which funds grassroots organizations throughout the world, and focuses on promoting education for disadvantaged youth.

If you want to find more ways to contribute to organizations that focus on literacy, here are some useful suggestions.

What were your favorite books when you were a child? What are your favorite books now? Leave a post in the comments below.

September 7, 2010

We [heart] travel!

Something about being back at work after the long weekend turns my thoughts to wandering. How about a post with a few random travel thoughts?

From Laura B, our resident design guru and America’s favorite dancer: If you’re in Budapest, don’t miss Gellert Baths. Here she is on the Old World Hungary Inspiration Trip with Emily (Chief Creative Officer and Co-founder). Love that taxi!

Emily and Laura B in Budapest

From Tami, graphic designer extraordinaire and recent vacation returnee: Check out Krakow, Poland, especially the nearby Wieliczka salt mine, a Unesco World Heritage Site. And definitely bring your kids.

Look for a blog post from Tami later this week, all about her fabulous European travels (including Hungary).

Who doesn’t love the idea of active travel? I’ve been wanting to go on a Backroads trip forever. I think 2011 is the year. Perhaps a little yoga, cycling, hiking, golf? Read Athleta’s blog post for a little inspiration to unleash your adventurous traveler. I think their new adventure travel clothes with an easy, athletic spin are pretty fun.

And speaking of travel clothes…our new women’s (that’s right, I said women’s) Palace Tee and Cafe Merino Henley make great lightweight, fashionable and consummately wearable traveling pieces. Add one of our new scarves and you’ll be ready to go there, wherever there is. Take them with you on your next journey, even if it’s just across the street.

Share some of your favorite journeys with us here by commenting on this blog post. Cheers!

September 3, 2010

The Money Hat (and Other Hungarian Folk Tales)

money hat cover

The Money Hat and other Hungarian Folk Tales was another great library find I discovered recently. Containing 14 Folk Tales covering such characters as witches and noblemen, heroes and soldiers, farmers and peasants, this book’s creation is a story in itself. Gyuri Biro was born in Budapest, but fled with his family to Austria after Hungary’s 1956 revolution. Biro held countless careers during his lifetime, as a cartoonist, an actor, a bartender, a professional boxer, and a draftsman. He eventually settled in the USA where he met Peggy Hoffman, and recruited her to help him write down the Folk Tales he was told as a child.

Putting together a collection of stories that has been passed down orally through generations is no easy feat, but this book has a lightness and yet very genuine feel and the stories are a pleasure to read. As a cartoonist, Biro also did all of the original illustrations:

 

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castle

The stories themselves are all a little too long to post here, but I highly recommend reading them. Most copies I’ve found have been at libraries as the book itself is out of print, but if you want to do further research it was published by Westminster Press in 1969.

* This is part of an ongoing blog series exploring children’s literature and folk tales from the regions of Hungary, Romania, and Croatia. Do you have any recommendations? If so please feel free to leave a comment below.

September 2, 2010

We heart Pad See Yew

We’re in the middle of our 2nd heatwave of the summer here in SF. The heat always makes me want to sweat it out with spicy Asian food.

Our CEO, Leigh Rawdon, sent me a fun post about her sons experiencing Thai food (and she happens to be in Asia right now):

We took the boys to a great Thai restaurant in Berkeley. Our four year old falls squarely in the camp of orange/white foods only. We asked him to try everything and to find one thing he liked. He voted for Pad See Yew, a rice noodle dish. Best of all, he was so proud to tell our waitress and anyone who would listen that he loved Pad See Yew. Our one year old, on the other hand, loved everything – especially these panko fried Taro and Yams (what’s not to love).

Matthew hearts Thai food!

A perfect Tea moment complete with the Korean inspired tee shirt!

And if you’d like to try your hand at Pad See Yew, here’s a great recipe from Food and Wine. Hmm, feels like a great night for a little Pad Thai.

September 1, 2010

Learn Your Animals in Croatian!

 

Art by Petit Collage

Art by Petit Collage

 

Slon  :  Elephant

Zmija  :  Snake

Cačak  :  Cat

Pas  :  Dog

Lav  :  Lion

Majmun  :  Monkey

Ovca  :  Sheep

Konj  :  Horse

Leptir  :  Butterfly

Sova : Owl

Sma :  Deer

Kurjak : Wolf

Jelen : Stag

Know them all? Play this fun game here!

Have you checked out our Sma, Kurjak, Sova, and Jelen clothes this season? :

collage