Tag Archives: art

March 21, 2011

What is Surrealism?

Surrealism is my favorite art movement (so far). Based mainly out of Europe and Latin America, Surrealism began in the 1920s, and spanned across multiple mediums, including painting, photography, sculpture, and theater. Often referencing the unconscious and subconscious, Surrealist art has a strange dream-like quality, pushing the boundaries of “normal” situations and combining images and scenes that are not often encountered in one space.

left to right: Salvador Dali, Meret Oppenheim, Max Ernst, (second row) Renee Magritte, Frida Kahlo, Jean Miro, (third row) Leonora Carrington, Man Ray, Leonor Fini

This season we have several pieces influenced by both modern and historical surrealist art, which Katy will post about this week.

March 17, 2011

In Celebration of Tiny Art Directors

If you’ve never seen the work of illustrator Bill Zeman and his daughter Rosie, you’re in for a treat. At the request of his daughter, Zeman illustrates scenes that she dictates and lets her judge the results. Some pieces are grudgingly approved, others adamantly denied, as Rosie does her best to pull “good art” out of her father.

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Tiny Art Director started as a blog, and was published as a book in 2010. While humor is the main goal of this work, Zeman also raises an interesting point about encouraging children to view art critically. Recently Rosie the Tiny Art Director has learned the best way to express something is to do it herself. How do children express their imaginary worlds? What art do they like and not like – and more importantly, why?

March 11, 2011

Balenciaga

 

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Cristobal Balenciaga Eizaguirre started his first fashion boutique in San Sebastian, Spain in 1918, at the age of 33. Following great success after the Spanish Civil War, Balenciaga relocated to Paris, where his revolutionary designs became hot commodities, dressing royalty and celebrities. Despite his move to France he never lost his love of Spain, and many of his earlier items were heavily influenced by flamenco dresses and historical Spanish garb.

 

Balenciaga never gave an interview during his career, and so for many existed as a man of mystery. After his retirement in 1968 the house of Balenciaga stopped all production until 1986, when Jacques Bogart re-opened it with the goal to create a new ready-to-wear line. Bringing designers from all over the world, the Balenciaga name is at the forefront of modern innovative fashion.

 

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If anyone is visiting San Francisco between now and July 4th 2011, be sure to check out the De Young Museum‘s exhibition Balenciaga and Spain. This retrospective examines the ways in which Spain as a nation influenced Balenciaga’s designs over the years.

 

 

February 16, 2011

Fashion Week: Joaquin Trias

Happy Fashion Week! We’re loving the range of creativity and talent that’s showcasing this year. One designer that stands out for us is Joaquin Trias, a Spanish designer from Madrid:

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TRIAS SS2011 NEW YORK 09/12/2010

 

 

We love the minimalist simplicity and warm colors of his new collection. To see more of his work you can visit his website here. The New York Times also did a fun interview on Trias here.

February 9, 2011

Visiting Museums with Kids

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Growing up in Santa Fe with an artist father, I experienced my fair share of galleries as a child. My dad would drag me along Canyon Road on nights with lots of gallery openings, and my attention would be held for about 0.2 seconds in each space before I got restless. It must have paid off though, as now I love galleries and museums and any opportunity to see art. But how can we help make viewing art, especially in museums, interesting and fun for kids?

Red Tricycle has a great article about visiting San Francisco MOMA with kids. They recommend visiting on Family Days, where there will be other kids to interact with, and signing up for museum tours that are specifically catered to children.

Many museums cater specific programming and events to be kid friendly. You can get information on the following museums below:

SFMOMA – San Francisco

De Young Museum – San Francisco

Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York

Museum of Fine Art – Boston

Museum of Contemporary Art – Chicago

Art Institute of Chicago – Chicago

Walters Art Museum – Baltimore

Baltimore Museum of Art – Baltimore

Getty Museum – Los Angeles

MOCA – Los Angeles

What are you favorite ways to share art with your kids?

February 7, 2011

Yosigo

We love these ocean surf images by Yosigo, a young Spanish photographer:

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To see more of his work check out his website here.