Tag: art

The Pink City: City Palace

Pink City #2The “Pink City” is the name given the magical city of Jaipur, India. Anyone who has been lucky enough to travel to Jaipur can attest, the city truly glows shades of pink. But, why pink? In 1876, the Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria were to be visiting India on a tour. In India, pink denotes the color of hospitality so, the Maharaja Ram Singh of Jaipur painted the whole city pink to welcome his guests. The pink still stands and Jaipur residents, by law, are asked to maintain the pink color of their residences.

Sounds of India

See this man playing the kaimacha, a bowed string instrument used in folk music from the region of Rajasthan.

See this man playing the kaimacha, a bowed string instrument used in folk music from the region of Rajasthan.

The unique and rich music of India spans many genres from fusion to classical with a varied range of instruments. The striking sounds of the sitar have influenced many musicians – even all the way into popular Western music rock & roll music. Check out our playlist to see why the Beatles and The Rolling Stones were so drawn to the mystical sounds of the sitar. Don’t forget to listen to “The Sun Won’t Set” by Norah Jones and Anoushka Shankar – sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar’s daughters.

Your Favorite Tea Prints on Art.com

Hungriger Bär and Glücklicher Fuchs or hungry bear and happy fox are two of our favorite graphics from the fall collection and we think they’re pretty great in framed form, too!

Tea Collection on Art.com

paper mache moose // map bunting // tree house print // bear print // get lost print
owl mask // wild & free print // marquee letter // i’ll eat you up print // squirrel print

Tea Collection on Art.com

forest print // fox print // wooden heart // tassel garland // arrow print // wooden name
leaf study print // forest animal prints // wooden moon

Fall Fashion Report: Triangles

tea collection finds triangle trend

Above: SassandBide, Style, Tea Collection, Pinterest, itscamillecom, Crushable,

Triangle prints hit the runway for fall style. We couldn’t be more thrilled as we saw tons of geometric pieces to inspire our fall collection while on our inspiration trip for Nordic Design.

tea collection finds triangles on inspiration trip to Scandinavia

Above: From Tea Collection’s trip pics

Will you be following this fall trend? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below.

How to Batik (kid-friendly!)

Our Bali-inspired children’s clothes collection featured the craft of Batik, an art form we saw and practiced while in Bali. Traditional Batiks are created with hot wax, in a dying technique which allows the craftsman to form lush patterns and designs.  We wanted to find a way for little citizens to Batik that was safe.  Below is our step-by-step guide on how-to Batik- no hot wax needed! All you need is  glue, paint, a t-shirt and an open mind!

I chose to Batik a shirt- however you can Batik any cloth materials.  Think of how much fun it would be to Batik pillow cases?

DIY Batik for Kids

You'll need a shirt, a piece of cardboard to stick between your shirt, acrylic paints, washable gel glue, and a paint brush.

The first step is to design your Batik pattern.  You’ll use the glue to do this. It can be a little tricky to wield the glue, so you may want to have your little ones practice glue drawing on cardboard first.  You can also map out your design first with pencil. I also used a scrap piece of cardboard to put in the shirt so the glue wouldn’t seep through to the back of the shirt.

Kid Friendly Batik DIY

Where ever you put the glue will be white. The color will show through the negative space. Pretty cool, huh?

The next step is hardest. You have to wait for the glue to dry and this will take at least 24 hours.  Playing the waiting game can be hard when you have little citizens eager to paint!

Once the glue is completely dry, break out your acrylic paints, your paint brush, a mixing area, and a water bowl to clean the brush and start painting! While painting, you’ll want to keep the the piece of cardboard inside the shirt for the same reason you kept it in while gluing- you don’t want the paint to leak through to the back of the shirt.

DIY Batik For Kids

Once the Batik is painted, leave it in a safe place where the paint can dry. This will probably take at least 12 hours.  Once dry, you can either peel off the glue or put it in the washing machine. I chose the latter as it was much easier and had great results. Check out my finished Batik shirt below.

DIY Kid-Friendly Batik ProjectThe picture minimalizes the cool effect the process created.  The colors are much more vibrant and the designs pop more in person. All-in-all, this is a great project for those looking to craft a gift for a loved one (Mother’s Day or Father’s Day Batiks?).

Please share your Batiks with our community at Facebook. We’d love to see your little citizens artful, Bali-inspired work!