Tag Archives: Destination: Old World Hungary

October 7, 2010

Petrut Calinescu

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Petrut Calinescu is a Romanian photographer who is based out of Bucharest. An accomplished photojournalist, Calinescu’s work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times, Business Week, and Esquire.

This body of work focuses on the Danube Delta in Romania, a lush area of marshes and lakes that originally stemmed from the Black Sea.

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Calinescu’s work manages to capture quiet moments of human interaction with the Danube, with their jobs, and day to day tasks.

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Viewing the perspective of the region from someone who is native to this country is a unique experience. For more of Petrut Calinescu’s work, on subjects such as Transylvania, The Ocean, or countries foreign to him, such as India, or Afghanistan, visit his website.

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October 6, 2010

Learn your Fruits and Vegetables in Romanian

Cards from Drenculture's Etsy Shop

Cards from Drenculture's Etsy Shop

Apple : Măr

Banana : Banană

Carrot : Morcov

Strawberry : Căpşune

Peaches : Piersici

Pepper : Ardei

Corn : Porumb

Pumpkin : Dovleac

Lettuce : Salată Verde

Pineapple : Ananas

Onion : Ceapă

Want to hear how the words are pronounced? Click here.

Interested in learning how to count to ten in Hungarian, or learn some animals in Croatian? Check out our other language posts from this season’s destination of Old World Hungary!

September 23, 2010

Bicikl, Bicicleta, Bicycle, Bicikli

It’s no secret that we love bicycles at Tea.  As a testament to bikes this season we designed our Bicycle Tee, celebrating Bicycles in Croatian, Romanian, English, and Hungarian:

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Commuting to and from work in San Francisco has convinced me that biking is the best way to see a city, whether it’s the one you live in now, or a new one entirely. Happily I’m not the only one with that opinion, and now there are bike tour options in almost any country you visit. This 8 day bike tour along the Dalmation Coast in Croatia is top of my adventure destination list, followed by this 7-day tour of Castles in Transylvania.

 

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

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Hunedoara Castle, Transylvania

Winter may be just around the corner, but in most parts of the USA it’s still warm enough to hop on your bike and go for a ride.  We’ll see you out there!

September 15, 2010

The Fashion World of Dora Abodi

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New York Fashion Week is in full swing at the moment, with designers from all over the world presenting their latest collections. Curious about whether any of the designers were from our current collection’s regions of Hungary, Romania, or Croatia, I stumbled across the stunning work of Dora Abodi.

Dora Abodi was born in the Transylvania region, though her heritage is Hungarian, Romanian, German, Dutch, and Armenian. Her childhood was spent designing outfits for her dolls and toys. After studying law and journalism she finally decided to focus her energy on Fashion, and she graduated from Mod’Art International Budapest fashion school. Although only 26, she is already taking the fashion world by storm.

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Adobi references literature, sci-fi books, and European comics as inspiration for her line, as well as movie stars from the 1940s, and says that she likes to create stories with her collections. When asked what hurdles she has had to overcome in her career she states “From Eastern Europe it is harder to develop a successful brand because of the financial problems, but on the other side it is a very inspirational and not yet discovered cultural milieu, so  Hungarian designers are ‘rara avis’ and more interesting.”

Ecologically aware, Adobi tries to keep her lines as environmentally conscious as possible. Although handbags are a large part of her line, she does not use exotic leathers, only those from animals such as goats, cows, and sheep.

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You can see Abodi’s work in person September 21st and 22nd at the Capsule Show in NYC.

September 13, 2010

The Wolves of Transylvania

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The Carpathian mountains of Romania are home to a very large population of gray wolves. Commonly called Transylvania, this region contains the largest popluation of wild carnivorous animals in Western Europe. Recent counts have estimated that approximately 3,500 grey wolves live in this beautiful mountainous region, which makes up about 40% of the wolf population in Europe.

Grey wolves are the second largest carnivore in Europe, and can reach up to almost 5 feet in length and 175 pounds in weight. They live in hierarchical packs, and hunt mostly deer, boar, and smaller wild animals. Despite the negative stereotypes around their species and their widespread presence in  Romania, they seldom come into contact with humans, preferring to keep to themselves in the deepest regions of the Carpathian mountains.

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Copyright © 2009-2010 Victoria Hillman

Grey wolves are not currently at risk for extinction, but their environments are still being threatened. With human populations expanding, the large natural territories they need for hunting and breeding are becoming smaller. Negative perception of their species by humans lead to a vast extermination of them throughout central and Northern Europe during the 19th century.

In acknowledgment of this beautiful region and the wildlife that inhabits it, we designed our Mt. Tampa Wolf Graphic Tee this season:

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In support of efforts to help save this remarkable animal, Tea will adopt a Grey Wolf through World Wildlife Fund‘s Adopt an Animal program for one lucky winner. To enter the contest visit our facebook page, and comment on our post about Grey Wolves. Share with us your child’s favorite wild animal by the end of the day and the randomly selected winner will be announced tomorrow! To read more about WWF’s program, click here.

September 7, 2010

We [heart] travel!

Something about being back at work after the long weekend turns my thoughts to wandering. How about a post with a few random travel thoughts?

From Laura B, our resident design guru and America’s favorite dancer: If you’re in Budapest, don’t miss Gellert Baths. Here she is on the Old World Hungary Inspiration Trip with Emily (Chief Creative Officer and Co-founder). Love that taxi!

Emily and Laura B in Budapest

From Tami, graphic designer extraordinaire and recent vacation returnee: Check out Krakow, Poland, especially the nearby Wieliczka salt mine, a Unesco World Heritage Site. And definitely bring your kids.

Look for a blog post from Tami later this week, all about her fabulous European travels (including Hungary).

Who doesn’t love the idea of active travel? I’ve been wanting to go on a Backroads trip forever. I think 2011 is the year. Perhaps a little yoga, cycling, hiking, golf? Read Athleta’s blog post for a little inspiration to unleash your adventurous traveler. I think their new adventure travel clothes with an easy, athletic spin are pretty fun.

And speaking of travel clothes…our new women’s (that’s right, I said women’s) Palace Tee and Cafe Merino Henley make great lightweight, fashionable and consummately wearable traveling pieces. Add one of our new scarves and you’ll be ready to go there, wherever there is. Take them with you on your next journey, even if it’s just across the street.

Share some of your favorite journeys with us here by commenting on this blog post. Cheers!

September 3, 2010

The Money Hat (and Other Hungarian Folk Tales)

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The Money Hat and other Hungarian Folk Tales was another great library find I discovered recently. Containing 14 Folk Tales covering such characters as witches and noblemen, heroes and soldiers, farmers and peasants, this book’s creation is a story in itself. Gyuri Biro was born in Budapest, but fled with his family to Austria after Hungary’s 1956 revolution. Biro held countless careers during his lifetime, as a cartoonist, an actor, a bartender, a professional boxer, and a draftsman. He eventually settled in the USA where he met Peggy Hoffman, and recruited her to help him write down the Folk Tales he was told as a child.

Putting together a collection of stories that has been passed down orally through generations is no easy feat, but this book has a lightness and yet very genuine feel and the stories are a pleasure to read. As a cartoonist, Biro also did all of the original illustrations:

 

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The stories themselves are all a little too long to post here, but I highly recommend reading them. Most copies I’ve found have been at libraries as the book itself is out of print, but if you want to do further research it was published by Westminster Press in 1969.

* This is part of an ongoing blog series exploring children’s literature and folk tales from the regions of Hungary, Romania, and Croatia. Do you have any recommendations? If so please feel free to leave a comment below.