Tag: Foreign Correspondents

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS: A Family Trip Through Greece

paragraph 1Our summer was magical.  We are so lucky to be able to bring our children to the place of their roots, Greece, where my parents grew up and where my husband’s paternal grandfather hailed from, too.  Greece is a country that loves children, embraces the sun, respects the sea, and takes great pride in its very ancient history.  

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS: A Family Trip

Our grandparents in Belgium, live near the “kattekensberg” or the “cat mountain”. In the 19th century the inhabitants of the city of Antwerp, were attracted to this beautiful green region with its prairies, birch woods and sand mountains, to relax. My cousin and I play in our camp in the forest of the cat mountain and afterwards eat my Grandad’s pancakes!

foreign correspondents

My brother and I explore Tarragona, a city in the north of Spain where the Romans (200 BC) built impressive “bread and circuses” infrastructure to please people, we came across this statue of a mommy wolf. We have heard stories of bad wolves chasing pigs or red riding hood, but this one seems to be feeding two little brothers. We would not want to exchange our mom for a wolf. But we are pretty good at building stuff, like these two brothers boys Romulus and Remus who eventually built Rome.

Kid-Friendly Recipes + A Cookbook Giveaway

Woodies - Lemonade Truck - CopyIt’s not everyday you meet fraternal twin toddlers with better manners and palates than most adults you know. Meet The2Woodies – Carter and Tucker Hellman, twins, travelers and Tea lovers! We had the chance to meet the little guys and their family to learn more about them before they took off for yet another trip.

The boys are only 3 years old, but it’s safe to say they’re already seasoned travelers. They’ve been across the U.S. and traveled abroad – they’re favorite part? The food! No picky eaters here, they’ll try almost anything and often ask for foreign dishes to be made at home after their travels have concluded. Not only are they good eaters, but they love to cook! The love cooking so much that together with their parents, they created their very own cookbook featuring their favorite dishes! Today we’re sharing 3 of their recipes and giving you the chance to win their cookbook, The 2Woodies Cookbook: Eats and Treats for the Gourmet Toddler.

Have You Traveled to India?

We love sharing stories of our travels with you here on Studio T. It’s a great way for us to connect with you and convey the story behind our collection. Our hope is that our sense of adventure resonates with you and your little citizens!

Do you love to travel like we do? Have you ever traveled to India? If you’re up for it, we would love to collaborate on a guest post. Your story may be featured in our monthly newsletter! Fill out our poll below and we’ll be in touch!

Interested in sharing your adventures? Learn more about our Foreign Correspondents program here.

Foreign Correspondents: A Whirlwind Voyage

valerie

We are a family of experienced travelers – having visited more than 20 countries, from Canada to Jordan. On our far-flung jaunts, we enjoy immersing ourselves in the local culture, language and cuisine, experiencing the locals’ lives.

Our latest voyage was our longest – 3 weeks, 7 countries, from Copenhagen south to the D-Day beaches of Normandy and back again.  This time, our itinerary was carefully planned with the tastes of our 12-year-old son Michael in mind. Michael, with his zeal for ancient history, medieval weaponry, seafood, and chocolate, and strong opinions to boot, sets the tone for our activities. As always, he did not disappoint.

ghentcanal

Leaving Copenhagen’s Kastrup Airport in the morning, we began our GPS-aided foray into downtown Copenhagen on an unseasonably warm day. Although temperatures hovered in the high 20s Celsius, low 80s Fahrenheit, the lack of humidity was summer time bliss for us, natives of Washington, D.C.’s  sticky suburbs.

Our first stop was Amalienborg Palace, where we enjoyed the sun-splashed morning and jostled with tourists of various nationalities as the changing of the guards unfolded. Soon, our jet lag caught up with us. We craved rest, finding welcome relaxation amidst a fountain and flower garden. Michael inspired our second wind, styling with my Tea Collection FashionABLE scarf.

After our car’s GPS led us astray a few times in the capital city and around Copenhagen’s teeming crowds of bicyclists, we found the Nationalmusset, home of the new Viking exhibition, featuring the Rothskilde 6 – the world’s longest surviving Viking ship. Michael enjoyed the exhibit’s interactive computer program, where he lived the Viking life. Not surprisingly, his pillaging, negotiating, and trading earned him the title of Viking.

lubeck1

After several wonderful days in Denmark, we headed south. Our destination was the Netherlands, through Germany via the Autobahn. While my husband Bruce enjoys life in the 130 plus km/hour lane, I take things a bit slower. After watching dozens of German drivers zip past me on the left, I wanted a break for lunch. Finding an Autobahn rest stop, we toasted each other with German bottled water, cheese, chocolate, and fruit.

The soaring cathedral, marvelous architecture, and canals of Utrecht, Netherlands, warmly welcomed us that evening. Utrecht is a university town, with its share of cyclists admirably navigating the narrow alleys and cobblestone streets. After the bicycle overload of Copenhagen, Michael noted that Utrecht’s two-wheeled denizens were much fewer in number, although no less brazen while driving through pedestrians and forcing cars to avoid them.

Our early morning Utrecht departure was marred by heavy rain. Fortunately, our rainy drive to Ghent, Belgium was short. Michael was excited about Ghent’s 12th century Gravensteen Castle, with its “Museum of Judicial Objects.”  These torture instruments, racks, handcuffs, and knives, were used to extract confessions. If no confession flowed from the persuasion, the guillotine awaited. We eyed the castle’s own guillotine, pondering its gory past. As the rain continued pelting us, we found salvation in our hotel and a bag of Belgian chocolates.

Les Andelys, France (2)

Sunshine marked the next morning when we drove to France for nine days. We all eagerly anticipated croissants, baguettes, cheese, and much more.

From our wonderful gîte in Caumont l’Evente, we drove the narrow Norman roads to the magnificent Bayeux Tapestries, cathedrals, abbeys, and chateaux, highlighted by the stunning Chateau de Carrouges and William the Conquerer’s birthplace in Falaise. Everywhere we went, monuments, flags, and markers reminded us of World Wars I and II, and of course, D-Day, June 6, 1944.

My great-uncle from Pennsylvania came ashore at Omaha Beach on D-Day and was killed in action. Michael wanted to know more about what his ancestor did that day so we visited D-Day beaches, inspected German fortifications, talked about the allied landings, and gazed somberly at the starkly white grave markers of the American military cemetery at Colleville-Sur-Mer. While walking among the American graves, Michael quietly noticed the number of soldiers killed on D-Day and those who died during the war’s final days.

We topped off our last day in Normandy with a fantastic dinner at Chateau d’Audrieu, a marvelous 18th century abode and a one-star Michelin restaurant. C’est magnifique!

marmoutiercath

Wrapping up our journey, we headed east, visiting Alsace-Lorraine. Michael enjoyed the many Roman artifacts we saw. While my husband and I marveled at the Roman Empire’s ancient reach, Michael shrugged, assuring us that this was old news to him.

Driving through Germany on the way back to Copenhagen, we stopped in Cologne. There we visited the city’s magnificent cathedral and our priority – the Schokoladenmuseum. Michael loved learning how chocolate was made, enjoying a Willy Wonka-esque sample.

Three weeks later, we returned home with great memories, wine, chocolate, jam, crackers and tea that will keep our trip alive for a long time!

Foreign Correspondents: Our Most Important Trip So Far…

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondents

We have been traveling as a family since the kids were really small.  I want them to see everything and I want them to be curious about the world we live in.  Most of all, I want them to know who they are.

This last trip we took was really important because we decided to take my guys to meet my mother’s family in Japan.

After a 9 hour plane ride and almost as many hours on trains we arrived in Kochi, a little town on the island of Shikoku in the south of Japan.

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondent

My guys were a little nervous at first.  Who were all these people?

But here we were in the very place my mom lived until she was about their age.  And it was pretty magical seeing it all through their eyes.

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondent

We visited some neat sites; an old castle, the bustling Harume market and a famous little bridge.

We also stopped by a beautiful shrine perched high on a cliff on the other side of the Pacific Ocean from where we live now.  The boys were amazed that the same ocean touched this beach and the beach near our house.

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondent

My favorite moment was walking the road between my grandpa and grandma’s family homes, realizing how close their families lived to one another in this little town; watching my kids run with glee.

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondent

Why on earth did my grandpa and grandma leave all this and move to North America so many years ago?

We traveled back up north to see the boat my mom journeyed to Canada on with her little sister and my grandma.  The Hikara Maru is now a museum in Yokohama Japan.

Tea Collection's Foreign Correspondent

Traveling with all our luxuries now: cell phones, laptops, ipads and easy commercial air travel I realize how brave my grandmother was traveling alone across rocky seas to a foreign land with two small children in tow.

“Do you know that my grandma came to Canada on this boat?” I overhear one of my guys telling the other.

“So did mine!” his brother says.

And so did mine.

I’m so glad we made this journey.  In trying to help my kids figure out who they are, I’m learning so much about myself.

Through the Eyes of Children

One of our Foreign Correspondents has returned from her travels! Cathy and her family traveled to Zimbabwe this winter to visit family. Cathy is a teacher who took leave from her position during the birth of her twins. When her children were toddlers, she filled her time by acting as a founding parent of a charter initiative to open Birchtree Charter School, a Waldorf-inspired school in her  hometown of Palmer, Alaska. Since the school’s opening in fall 2010, she has acted as the treasurer on the Academic Policy Committee. We outfitted Cathy’s family with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is part three of their adventure.

travel with kids

I’m often asked if I believe there is true benefit in traveling abroad with young children. Will they remember their experiences? Couldn’t we simply take them to any beach or pool and they’d have an equally fantastic time? My answer – well, yes and no. Children are typically quite perceptive and are often more cognizant than we assume. Sure, my children love any beach at any time, yet my motivation for taking them abroad and exposing them to new cultures, beliefs, and attitudes is primarily because I believe that these experiences broaden perspectives in children (and adults).  Through each and every traveling adventure, we are challenged with all that is new and different.

travel with kids

So, what do we do with all the newness?  How do we process it both during the trip and after- to extend our understanding and to ensure that the experience of traveling abroad does not end when we unpack our suitcases and settle, once again, into our daily lives? Like many travelers, our family takes photos, utilizes travel journals, and we purchase works of art that transport us back to our time abroad.  These mementos enable us to deepen reflections and observations once home.

Travel with Kids

On our latest adventure through Southern Africa, we decided it was time for our children to take a more active role in documenting their experiences in order to help solidify their individual memories and give them an avenue for sharing our trip with others. To help with the documentation endeavor, we provided each of our six year old twins as well as our six year old niece with a camera. The cameras were given well in advance of our departure to ensure that our children knew how to use them and be responsible for general care. Additionally, a blank journal, colored pencils, watercolors, and crayons were provided to allow freedom in documenting daily experiences through stories, words, or simply drawings.

travel with kids

Watching the documentation process throughout the trip was a fascinating experience.  When happening upon large African beetles, we would have predicted running and screaming from our children, but found that they chose to photograph collect, analyze, and draw these strange creatures. Massive thunderstorms, which are rare in Alaska, were also documented with photos and later drawn with great detail. Our children drew pictures of an African woman transporting a fifty pound load on her head. They painted a double rainbow over Victoria Falls, and pictures of elephants and giraffes filled their SD cards. No doubt, these kids were recognizing an abundance of unique stimuli.

travel with kids

Now that we have returned home, our children are working to turn their photos into books, and have enjoyed sharing both the pictures drawn, stories written, and photos taken with friends, classmates, and family. With each sharing, I’m certain our children deepen their memories of this adventure.

As we’ve begun to unpack our memories and experiences, we recollect the many differences along the way; weather patterns, food, dress, language, customs, and routines- that were very different from those in our daily lives. Yet, we find the differences both curious and fascinating. Our children have begun to recognize that differences are neither good nor bad, but always mentally stimulating. Perhaps, they are also recognizing the commonalities we have as humans and that we can work to respect differences and learn from one another. And perhaps, we can use our broadened perspectives in our daily lives.

travel with kids