Tag: little citizens

We Make The Foreign Familiar

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Every time we travel, whether it’s across the street or across the globe, we strive to step outside of our comfort zone, meet new people and learn new things. When our designers travel to gather inspiration for next season’s styles, they go off the beaten path, meet with local craftsmen and eat the local cuisine. When they come back to San Francisco to design, their experiences are translated into beautifully designed prints and graphics. Take a look at our style descriptions and you’ll learn the inspiration behind the design of each piece.

We Are Local

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We are local. In 2002, Tea Collection was founded here in the Bay Area at our co-founder Emily’s dining room table (which we still have in our office today!). We are proud of our city and love meeting our neighbors. With Studio Tea just across the street from our home at 1 Arkansas, we’re excited to invite you into our space to have the chance to connect. Bring a friend or two, the more the merrier!

We Are Makers

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We are makers. Twice a year, Tea designers go out into the world in search of inspiration for our children’s clothing collection. We discover new places and faces, time-honored traditions and handmade creations. We study indigenous art and style, and immerse ourselves in the customs of the host country. We make friends with local craftspeople, learning about their process and traditions. Then we bring the world home and translate it into a twirly floral dress, a vibrant graphic tee, a sweet baby romper… We create globally inspired, well-made, beautiful clothing. Every one of our textiles is designed here in our San Francisco headquarters. Using an array of techniques, from sketching to hand carving stamps and even painting on plexiglass, our design team creates our one-of-a-kind prints and patterns, infused with the spirit of the destination. Come on a journey with us to see how a style goes from an idea to a final design.

Turning a Work Trip Into A Memorable Vacation

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To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write a blog post to share their adventures with all of us (and the world)! Diana, Tea’s Director of Production & Sourcing, extended her work travel to become a personal vacation in Peru. Here she shares stories of a trip that will forever live in their hearts.

Foreign Correspondent: Living in Guatemala

Meet Denise Zimmer, who lived in Guatemala with her family for nearly five years. As a Tea Foreign Correspondent, before they moved back to the United States, Denise and her family embarked on weekend trips and came back to share her stories with us at Studio Tea. Follow along!

My husband and I had the privilege of living in Guatemala for almost five years, but when the time came to repatriate to the USA we realized there was still so much of the diverse country we hadn’t shared with our girls, who were born there. We set the intention to soak in as much as possible and here we share some of those last special moments.

Festival de Barriletes

Locals and tourist alike gather in the cemetery of Santiago to watch the construction of gigante barriletes (gigantic kites). This coincides with Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), a holiday to remember and honor the spirits of the dead.

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Kitsune Masks

16wtr1_s_01_535The kitsune (fox) mask is one of the most famous traditional masks in Japan. Masks have been a part of Japanese song, dance, religion and celebration for hundreds of years. Lately, they have also become popular in pop culture, seen throughout Japanese TV shows and anime. Learn more about kitsune masks and download a mask DIY activity for your little citizens.

Wishes from Around the World

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In Japan, it’s tradition to write your prayers or wishes on small wooden plaques and place them outside the Shinto shrines around Japan. These wooden plaques are called ema. You may also see paper fortunes tied to tree branches. These are called omikuji. When we visited the shrines in Japan, we loved seeing all of ema plaques and omikuji fortunes hanging outside.We were so inspired by this tradition that we decided to share our wishes on Instagram using the #ShareMyWish. Learn more about the tradition of the ema and omikuji and scroll through our wishes!