Tag: random acts of inspiration

Japanese School Lunches

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Japan is a culture filled with etiquette and customs and this is true no matter your age. In Japan… lunch is much more than a 15 minute free for all. There are lessons to learn here too! Many Japanese school children, like Jiyu, move aside their desks to dust and clean their classroom once a day.

Kanji Activity

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More than 2,000 kanji characters make up the Japanese language, and each character has a meaning as well as a sound. Kanji are used for writing nouns, adjectives, adverbs and verbs. Their beautiful designs are seen throughout Japan, on buildings, signs, in newspapers… everywhere you look! We were mesmerized by not only the beauty of the written kanji, but how each kanji character, when written out, can look like the thing it describes. We’ve put together 6 kanji characters for you to try at home with your little citizens. Download our acitivty sheet and make sure to share you kanji with us!

Kanji

Ramen, Udon, Soba… Oh my!

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Think you’re skilled with chopsticks? Meet Jiyu, our friend in Tokyo who at the young age of 3, has mastered the art. In Japan… ramen, udon and soba are three popular kinds of noodles kids eat throughout the week. Learn more about these yummy noodles and get our recipe for a kid-friendly for ramen, just like the dish we enjoyed in Tokyo. 

All About the Lucky Cat

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If you’ve ever been in a Japanese restaurant or strolled through Japantown or Chinatown in a nearby city, chances are you’ve noticed a little cat statue on a shelf or in a shop window. You may have even noticed that little cat waving it’s paw at you! This little cat figurine, called maneki neko, is a lucky charm that is very popular in Japanese cultures. Maneki neko (or lucky cat) is a talisman that is believed to attract good luck or fortune to those who own one. Here’s what we’ve learned about this good luck charm…

School Lunches in Japan

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As an American stepping into a Japanese public school, you’re bound to notice some differences. Especially at lunch time. Learn how the Japanese public school lunch program, called kyushoku, helps shape students from the very beginning of their schooling.

Foreign Correspondent: Falling in Love with Japan

Kiyomizu IMG_6080Meet Marya, our latest Foreign Correspondent who traveled with her family through Japan this past spring. Here, she shares a personal story of their experience and how they all fell in love with Japan again, on their second trip there as a family.

Konnichiwa, Japan!

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Tea travels the world. We truly go there. We travel to discover. To dream. To explore the wonder of the world around us, across the globe and across the street. Since 2002, we’ve traveled, always inspired by the people we meet and the places we see. Wherever we go, from Bali to Norway, West Africa to Morocco, we take in all we can and bring it back to our home base in San Francisco to design globally-inspired clothing for your little citizen. The world is woven into every thread of Tea, with each collection featuring a new destination we’ve traveled to. This fall, we’re excited to announce that we’re off to Japan!