Tag: travel with kids

Learn your Fruits and Vegetables in Romanian

Cards from Drenculture's Etsy Shop

Cards from Drenculture's Etsy Shop

Apple : Măr

Banana : Banană

Carrot : Morcov

Strawberry : Căpşune

Peaches : Piersici

Pepper : Ardei

Corn : Porumb

Pumpkin : Dovleac

Lettuce : Salată Verde

Pineapple : Ananas

Onion : Ceapă

Want to hear how the words are pronounced? Click here.

Interested in learning how to count to ten in Hungarian, or learn some animals in Croatian? Check out our other language posts from this season’s destination of Old World Hungary!

Bicikl, Bicicleta, Bicycle, Bicikli

It’s no secret that we love bicycles at Tea.  As a testament to bikes this season we designed our Bicycle Tee, celebrating Bicycles in Croatian, Romanian, English, and Hungarian:

Picture 2

Commuting to and from work in San Francisco has convinced me that biking is the best way to see a city, whether it’s the one you live in now, or a new one entirely. Happily I’m not the only one with that opinion, and now there are bike tour options in almost any country you visit. This 8 day bike tour along the Dalmation Coast in Croatia is top of my adventure destination list, followed by this 7-day tour of Castles in Transylvania.


Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia


Hunedoara Castle, Transylvania

Winter may be just around the corner, but in most parts of the USA it’s still warm enough to hop on your bike and go for a ride.  We’ll see you out there!

The Wolves of Transylvania


The Carpathian mountains of Romania are home to a very large population of gray wolves. Commonly called Transylvania, this region contains the largest popluation of wild carnivorous animals in Western Europe. Recent counts have estimated that approximately 3,500 grey wolves live in this beautiful mountainous region, which makes up about 40% of the wolf population in Europe.

Grey wolves are the second largest carnivore in Europe, and can reach up to almost 5 feet in length and 175 pounds in weight. They live in hierarchical packs, and hunt mostly deer, boar, and smaller wild animals. Despite the negative stereotypes around their species and their widespread presence in  Romania, they seldom come into contact with humans, preferring to keep to themselves in the deepest regions of the Carpathian mountains.


Copyright © 2009-2010 Victoria Hillman

Grey wolves are not currently at risk for extinction, but their environments are still being threatened. With human populations expanding, the large natural territories they need for hunting and breeding are becoming smaller. Negative perception of their species by humans lead to a vast extermination of them throughout central and Northern Europe during the 19th century.

In acknowledgment of this beautiful region and the wildlife that inhabits it, we designed our Mt. Tampa Wolf Graphic Tee this season:


In support of efforts to help save this remarkable animal, Tea will adopt a Grey Wolf through World Wildlife Fund‘s Adopt an Animal program for one lucky winner. To enter the contest visit our facebook page, and comment on our post about Grey Wolves. Share with us your child’s favorite wild animal by the end of the day and the randomly selected winner will be announced tomorrow! To read more about WWF’s program, click here.

The Money Hat (and Other Hungarian Folk Tales)

money hat cover

The Money Hat and other Hungarian Folk Tales was another great library find I discovered recently. Containing 14 Folk Tales covering such characters as witches and noblemen, heroes and soldiers, farmers and peasants, this book’s creation is a story in itself. Gyuri Biro was born in Budapest, but fled with his family to Austria after Hungary’s 1956 revolution. Biro held countless careers during his lifetime, as a cartoonist, an actor, a bartender, a professional boxer, and a draftsman. He eventually settled in the USA where he met Peggy Hoffman, and recruited her to help him write down the Folk Tales he was told as a child.

Putting together a collection of stories that has been passed down orally through generations is no easy feat, but this book has a lightness and yet very genuine feel and the stories are a pleasure to read. As a cartoonist, Biro also did all of the original illustrations:




The stories themselves are all a little too long to post here, but I highly recommend reading them. Most copies I’ve found have been at libraries as the book itself is out of print, but if you want to do further research it was published by Westminster Press in 1969.

* This is part of an ongoing blog series exploring children’s literature and folk tales from the regions of Hungary, Romania, and Croatia. Do you have any recommendations? If so please feel free to leave a comment below.

Learn Your Animals in Croatian!


Art by Petit Collage

Art by Petit Collage


Slon  :  Elephant

Zmija  :  Snake

Cačak  :  Cat

Pas  :  Dog

Lav  :  Lion

Majmun  :  Monkey

Ovca  :  Sheep

Konj  :  Horse

Leptir  :  Butterfly

Sova : Owl

Sma :  Deer

Kurjak : Wolf

Jelen : Stag

Know them all? Play this fun game here!

Have you checked out our Sma, Kurjak, Sova, and Jelen clothes this season? :



Croation Tales of Long Ago


One of our readers and commenters recently told us about one of her favorite children’s book authors from Croatia – Ivana Brlić-Mažuranić. Although she passed away 1938 she is still considered to be one of Croatia’s most famous and well-loved writers for children. Born into a family of politicians and poets, Ivana homeschooled all six of her children, and became famous in 1913 for her book The Brave Adventures of Laptich. Croatian Tales of Long Ago was published in 1916 with huge success, which prompted Ivana’s nickname – “The Croatian Andersen” (in reference to Hans Christian Andersen). The stories are original, but reference characters and themes from traditional Slavic mythology.


In 2002 and 2003 an animation artist named Helena Bulaja decided to adapt some of the Croatian Tales of Long Ago into a web animation project.  In her words: “The digital revolution, the Internet, and modern communications are on one side, and the world of fairytales on the other…the concept of the interactive book is so open, and unlike film, theatre, or illustration, it can take almost any form, it can be a film, an illustration, a game…”  The website is a little dated, but the animation is stunning, such as in Yagor below:



Yagor from Helena Bulaja on Vimeo.

This is part of an ongoing blog series exploring children’s literature and folk tales from the regions of Hungary, Romania, and Croatia. Do you have any recommendations? If so please feel free to leave a comment below.

Happy St. Stephen’s Day!


Today is a Hungarian national holiday, celebrating St. Stephen I, Hungary’s patron saint and First King (between 1000 and 1038 AD). Through his powerful role as King he helped to establish the Kingdom of Hungary, so August 20th, while commemorating his life, also celebrates the birth of Hungary. During the Soviet occupation of Hungary St. Stephen’s day was dismissed as being “too religious”, and was replaced with a celebration of the Stalinist constitution, as well as a “celebration of new bread”, referring to the beginning of the harvest.

Modern day Budapest celebrates St. Stephen’s Day with fireworks, air shows, and outside fairs, with stands selling bread and cakes.

This season we happen to be carrying a shirt that references King Stephen’s reign – our Knights Double Decker Tee was inspired by the Knights of King Stephen’s army:



Have you ever been in Hungary during St. Stephen’s Day? Did you celebrate it as a child? Feel free to share your experiences in the comments.