Tag Archives: travel with kids

July 28, 2011

Foreign Correspondents: Feeling the Weather and Cool Water

Our first  Foreign Correspondent is here! Bijal Shah, her husband, and her two daughters spent ten days traveling around France this summer. We outfitted them with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is Part 4 of their adventure. Stay tuned for the rest of their story this week.

Our sense of touch or feel had more to do with the hot weather than anything else.  At one point as we were walking through the Greek sculpture room in the Lourve, the girls stopped walking. I realized that they had just walked on top of an air conditioning vent and were enjoying the feel of the cold air.  Needless to say, we all stood on top of the vent for an extended amount of time.

Standing on the cold air vent at the Louvre

Outside of our apartment in Aix-en-Provence, there was a small waterspout type of fountain that my younger daughter made it a point to run her hands in the cool water every time we exited or entered the apartment building.  As soon as she would get her hands wet she would chase after her dad to spray the water in his face.  It became a daily game for her to see how quickly she could get us wet.

Sitting in the heat of the Provence sunshine

Hilltop town of Gordes, "the windy city".

Our first driving adventure in Provence was towards the hilltop town of Gordes.  As soon as we got out of the car, we felt the “whoosh” of the strongest winds we had ever experienced outside of a tropical storm.  I was afraid my girls, especially my four year old would be blown over the edge of the mountain…probably false paranoia on my part.  We attempted to walk around town while we clung to each other and posed for pictures while hysterically laughing at how wild but kind of scary the wind was.   Finally we gave up and decided to sit down at a restaurant and have dinner, but every few minutes the canopy would get pulled up by the wind and come crashing back in place making everyone except the waitresses jump.

The day that we went to Avignon, we also went to Pont du Gard to see the ancient roman aqueducts. Under the bridge is a very cool and refreshing river that people swim and kayak in.  We didn’t get a chance to kayak like we wanted to but decided to get our feet wet since it was a warm sunny afternoon.  The girls enjoyed splashing in the cool water and feeling the slippery rocks under their feet.

Splashing in the river under the Pont due Gard

 

July 27, 2011

Foreign Correspondents: Listening to the Sounds of Paris and Provence

Our first  Foreign Correspondent is here! Bijal Shah, her husband, and her two daughters spent ten days traveling around France this summer. We outfitted them with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is Part 3 of their adventure. Stay tuned for the rest of their story this week!

The memories that come to mind about the interesting sounds of Paris and Provence are ones that my girls found the most unusual, exciting or soothing.   In Paris, they loved hearing the sirens of the emergency vehicles by and the music of the merry go round.  At the train station, they learned to anticipate the whistle blowing and would prepare by covering their ears.

Draing the scene outside the apartment window while listening to the street sounds.

But it was in Provence that sounds began to really become a part of the experience.  My older daughter and I snuck up to the terrace and discovered a flock of “crazy birds,” screeching and flying by the dozens over the rooftops with no purpose or pattern.  We sat there mesmerized by the sound of the chaotic birds.

View from the terrace, where the "crazy birds" were seen.

During the day, we heard the church bells chime on the hour and half hour.  Hearing the bells was a new experience for the girls, and they enjoyed counting the rings to determine what time it was.  As we left the city of Aix en Provence, we could hear the hum of the cicadas that populate Provence in the summertime.

Listening to cicadas outside the Chateau de Lourmarin

Towards the end of our trip to Provence we drove to Avignon, the site of the papal palace.  We ate gelato, people watched, and listened to French folk music while my younger daughter danced.  This was a moment that we will not soon forget; it touched all of our senses.

The square outside the Papal Palace

 

July 26, 2011

Foreign Correspondents: Sightseeing in France

Our first  Foreign Correspondent is here! Bijal Shah, her husband, and her two daughters spent ten days traveling around France this summer. We outfitted them with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is Part 2 of their adventure. Stay tuned for the rest of their story this week.

Our surroundings in France were incredible.  The most amazing moment we had, the one that made both of my daughters’ jaws drop, was seeing the Eiffel Tower change from a lit up tower to a sparkling beauty.  We knew that it would light up at night but all of a sudden, while we were on our night boat cruise it began to sparkle and continued to sparkle for five minutes. This was their single most memorable moment.

Right outside our hotel was the beautiful and peaceful Tuileries Garden.  This garden was our direct path to the Louvre, which held the Mona Lisa, my older daughter’s favorite painting.  At the Louvre, my daughters used their sense of sight to match the famous paintings they were seeing with the ones on their Louvre Bingo card that I had created at home, with the pictures of the most famous pieces of artwork at the museum.  The bingo game was perfect for keeping their attention (at least an hour) at the museum.  On our third day in Paris, we headed to Versailles to see the Sun King’s palace.  Here we once again used our sense of sight to count the number of sun symbols we saw in each room that we visited…another tactic to keep the girls excited and looking around at the beautiful decor in the heat and crowd of people. The favorite room for both girls was the Queen’s bedroom with the pink and flowery motif and total number of symbols counted was over 100.

Playing Picture Bingo at the Louvre

After Paris we headed to Provence, where we had rented a car and were able to tour on our own.  We drove to a 12th century working abbey called Senanque Abbey that was located in a valley outside of the hilltop village of Gordes.  It is impossible to put in words how beautiful the ancient Abbey looked surrounded by the hills and purple lavender fields.

Senanque Abbey outside of Gordes

On a whim, we decided to drive to the town of Lourmarin where we happened to come across an old chateau that was open to tours.  The Chateau de Lourmarin was a beautifully restored chateau from the 15th century with amazing views.  The restored kitchen inside the chateau was the favorite all around.

Chateau du Lourmarin

The next day we drove to the French Riviera coast. As we approached the coast we caught glimpses of the sapphire blue waters peaking out in between the hills. We drove to a picturesque coastal town called Sanary-sur-Mer.  It had a marina full of sailboats and a little boardwalk with cute shops and cafes. We were even able to take a dip in the ocean at a nearby beach.  All of the natural beauty in Provence was a stark contrast to the metropolitan beauty of Paris, but both were a feast for the eyes.

Sanary-sur-Mer

 

July 25, 2011

Foreign Correspondents: France Through Our Tastebuds

Our first  Foreign Correspondent is here! Bijal Shah, her husband, and her two daughters spent ten days traveling around France this summer. We outfitted them with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is Part 1 of their adventure. Stay tuned for the rest of their story this week!

The Shah family outside the Palace of Versailles

Our family vacation to France  was full of so many incredible experiences which left our daughters, ages 7 and 4 wanting to come back one day and experience it all again.  This week I will re-live our journey our taste buds experienced.

On our first day in Paris we came across a gelato shop on our walk back from the Eiffel tower. After a long wait and using the minimal French my husband knew, we finally sat down with our refreshing gelato. The strawberry and cantaloupe sorbets tasted just like fresh ice-cold fruit that was picked at the peak of ripeness!  The wonderfully cold gelato was a truly delicious and much needed reprieve in the hot Paris afternoon.

After a few days in Paris, we took the train to Aix-en-Provence, a small town in the south of France As a promise to the girls, we woke up early and headed to an outdoor farmer’s market with stalls of produce, meats, cheeses. The first things we bought were a bag of  beautiful dark cherries and a basket of strawberries.  The cherries were the sweetest we had ever tasted.  We couldn’t help but exclaim “wow” after the first bite of a fresh cherry.  While walking back to the apartment, we nearly devoured all the strawberries.

Each morning in the apartment we would have breakfast consisting of fresh fruit and warm croissants.  Directly next door to the apartment building was a family owned Boulangerie (bakery). Every morning my husband would run downstairs and buy some hot croissants and deliver them for breakfast.  We would sit on our rooftop terrace, eating our warm, melt-in-your-mouth croissants, juicy sweet fruits and enjoy the view of the orange tiled rooftops, church steeples and Mount St. Victoire in the background.  The food in Paris was fun for the girls, as was the experience of sitting in the outdoor cafés, but the farm fresh foods in Provence are the ones that still get their taste buds tingling.

May 26, 2011

2 Continents, 3 Countries, 2 Weeks, 3 Children (Part Three)

Kimberly Brambilla is guest posting on Studio T this week, telling the story of traveling with her three young children to Spain, Italy, and Morocco. Read parts one and two of her family’s journey!

From Morocco we took a ferry back to Spain, and hopped a bus to the city of Malaga, where we fell completely in love.  Even though it’s a large city it has a small town feel.  We enjoyed walking along the cobblestone streets, listening to ringing church bells, strolling past beautiful fountains and sitting at outdoor cafes.  I was ready to move there!   It was difficult to leave this city, but we eventually headed by train to Madrid.

In Madrid the highlights were visiting The Prado and seeing flamenco dance performance.  The girls were mesmerized by the dancing, the music, and the energy of the performers.   Olivia was a bit confused at first when no flamingos came on stage, but she still enjoyed the show! Afterwards we walked around the city, and the girls were thrilled to find a flamenco dress in a souvenir shop. They put on quite a few shows with that dress once we got back home.  In the end, there was still so much of Spain I wanted us to see.

Was it difficult taking a trip like this with children? You better believe it! Was it worth it?  Absolutely.  The girls had some major meltdowns and tantrums along the way but considering all of the flights, train rides, taxis, buses, ferry ride and all of the walking we subjected them to I think they were remarkable.  This experience was priceless, and I would encourage anyone who is given the opportunity to travel with their children not to pass it up.

Here are just a few tips that might be helpful if you are planning to travel with children.

*Talk to them a lot about your upcoming trip.  I have always found that preparing my children for what is coming, no matter what it is helps.  Get them excited by reading books & watching movies that pertain to the destination.  I also talk to mine about the parts that won’t be fun – the waiting in long lines, heat/cold, tiredness, etc.

* Learn the cultural dos & don’ts with your children. By doing this, as well as learning a few words & phrases in the native language, you will be treated better & respected much more than if you assume everyone everywhere speaks your language.

*If you are a family of 5+, consider renting an apartment versus staying at a hotel. Many hotels in Europe require 2 rooms for a party of 5+.  The price comes out to about the same & you have the convenience of a kitchen, washing machine & more space!

*When traveling in large cities, take a double decker style bus that drops you off and picks you up at the sites.  It’s an easier way of getting around & seeing more with children.

*If you’re like me, you’ll want to see everything but that isn’t always possible with kids.  It’s important to keep them happy too.  In Barcelona, my kids could have stayed at Catalunya Plaza for hours, not because of the architecture or the great people watching but because of the multitude of pigeons. Stopping at a park is a great way of giving children a break from touring.

May 25, 2011

2 Continents, 3 Countries, 2 Weeks, 3 Children (Part Two)

Kimberly Brambilla is guest posting on Studio T this week, telling the story of traveling with her three young children to Spain, Italy, and Morocco. Read part one of her journey here!

Chiara, Gisele, and Olivia with their cousin in Italy

From Barcelona, we flew to Italy.  My husband grew up in Mezzago, a small town close to Milan.  He’s from a large family so there are many aunts, uncles and cousins.  It wasn’t the first time our girls had been to Italy, but it’s always a bit of a culture shock at first. They’re greeted with tanti baci (many kisses), hugs and tears.  There’s a constant flow of family members and neighbors that come to see us.  It can be a bit overwhelming even for an adult, but it didn’t take long for the girls to warm up. We were so proud of their willingness to communicate with the family. Their Italian is rough but they sure try. My oldest, after playing and having fun with cousins, told us “I like speaking in Italian”.  That brought quite a smile to my husband’s face!  It is one thing to tell the girls about their Italian heritage, but it’s another to let them experience it firsthand.  It was sad to say goodbye after being smothered with much love, affection and pasta, but in the end we set off for Morocco.

Morocco is unlike any place I’ve ever been.  Many of our friends and family were concerned about us traveling there, but I am so thankful we did, because we learned so much.  We took a short flight from Italy to Tangier, Morocco.  When the doors on the plane opened it felt like we were a million miles from home and from everything familiar.  The short cab ride from the airport to the hotel confirmed for me that the world is so much larger than the small space I occupy in my little Florida town.  My girls loved  seeing stop signs written in Arabic, hearing Arabic on the radio and holding Moroccan coins.  Upon arriving at the hotel we went to the rooftop terrace for mint tea and cookies.  The girls loved this!  Chiara began making plans of how she would make her own tea once we returned to Florida with mint leaves from our garden.

The next day we toured the medina (city) as well as the outskirts of Tangier with our guide Cherif. Our first visit was to a rug store where we were able to see the process of Moroccan rug-making.  The girls loved the experience of being given mint tea and their own “magic carpets” to sit on.  We also rode camels, an experience which my daughter Olivia had been patiently waiting for!

The next day we visited the quiet town of Assilah.  In Morocco you can hire a taxi not just for one trip, but for the day.  The driver will wait for you while you explore, or accompany you, but most of the drivers speak little or no English.  Our driver Unes was wonderful.  He showed us around Assilah, ate lunch with us, and taught the girls a few Arabic words. He even bargained for Moroccan slippers for the girls at the marketplace, and we were all a little sad to say goodbye at the end of the day! It’s amazing how quickly you can connect with people even if you don’t speak the same language.   The next morning as we packed our bags to leave, Chiara sat at the window looking out onto the street.  She got so excited when she spotted Unes as he picked up more tourists in his taxi, and I was thrilled when I heard her say to him “Ahlan (hello) Mr. Unes”!  I knew in that moment that the goals I had set when planning this trip were becoming a reality.  My kids were learning about new cultures & peoples and embracing them as well.  Beautiful!

May 24, 2011

2 Continents, 3 Countries, 2 Weeks, 3 Children (Part One)

This week we’ll be featuring three posts by guest blogger Kimberly Brambilla. Last summer she and her husband took their three young daughters to 2 Continents and 3 Countries in 2 weeks! This is Part One – stay tuned for Parts Two and Three.

“Are you crazy?” I’ve become used to being asked this question as I’ve planned trips and traveled with my 3 small children.  Having children doesn’t stop me from doing what I love most– in fact having children has actually made me more determined to continue traveling, so that I can share this love with them.  I wish to instill in them a sense of adventure, an openness and appreciation of other peoples and their cultures and a love of exploring the world.

Chiara, Gisele, and Olivia

Last summer we embarked on a journey of a lifetime.  We traveled to Spain, Italy and Morocco.  I knew that traveling with a 7, 5 and 2-year old would present many challenges, but it would also undoubtedly be an incredible experience for my daughters Chiara, Olivia and Gisele.  We were going to Spain to vacation, but were also headed to Italy to spend time with “la familia”.  My husband’s family lives there, and the girls do not get the chance to see them often.  Since Morocco is only 9 miles from Spain I couldn’t pass up the chance to expose my children to a culture very unlike their own.

To prepare and get them excited we read library books about places we would visit, looked at maps, made art projects and learned simple words and phrases in Arabic and Spanish My husband also speaks Italian with the girls, so going to Italy would be an opportunity for them to practice.

With bags and camera packed we were off, and began the adventure in the colorful and vibrant city of Barcelona.  We were thoroughly exhausted after traveling by plane, train and automobile to reach our apartment rental in the city.  After dropping off our luggage, we began the search for a place to eat dinner.  We were so tired that we stopped at the first place we found.  It didn’t look like much, but boy were we surprised!  Chiara wanted to order spaghetti but we reminded her that we were going to try new food on this trip.  Once the paella, green olives, manchego cheese and fresh bread arrived at the table we were 5 very happy travelers.  Although the girls were a little shy about using Spanish words with the waiters, they loved their first Spanish meal.

The next couple of days we toured the city in double-decker buses, which we found was the perfect way to see a city with kids. We saw many of the famous sites such as Sagrada Familia Church, Casa Batllo, Park Guell, and also spent time at the beach.  Our time in Barcelona was short but the memories we made are long lasting.  Next it was time for the girls to experience and learn about their Italian heritage and roots.  Italia here we come!

April 26, 2011

Bike to School Day in San Francisco

April 7th was Bike to School Day in San Francisco. Thousands of kids of all ages rode to school with their parents and teachers, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions, encouraging daily exercise, and to have fun! More than 40 schools participated, making it the largest city-wide Bike to School Day yet.

 

We love that this is a yearly tradition in San Francisco, and although we’re not in school anymore, Tea is looking forward to Bike to Work Day on May 12th.

 

April 18, 2011

Studio T is looking for Foreign Correspondents

Above, Tea explores Korea, Mexico, and Spain

 

At Tea we are all about bringing the world home. Each season we visit a different global destination, and share our inspiration and the stories of our travels. We are appreciative of the beauty we find and the countries we explore. We’re cultural adventurists, apparel designers and global travelers. We believe in the journey. In discovery. In caring and connection. In diving in. In experiencing life with every bit of our souls. We go there. Across the globe. And across the street.

And now we want to hear about YOUR adventures. We’re on the hunt for three Foreign Correspondents to share their experiences with us on our blog Studio T, between now and the end of the year.

If you and your children are traveling internationally in the near future, write to us! Email blog@teacollection.com and describe the trip you’re planning on taking. Tell us:

- Where you are going, and for how long

- What the purpose of your trip is – is it to experience a specific culture, reconnect with family roots, or do community service?

- How you plan on maximizing your travel experience with your children along the way

Before you leave we’ll give you a $500 Gift Certificate to fill your suitcase with travel clothes from Tea.

Once you return, share your stories and photographs of the people you’ve met, the food you ate, the fashion you saw, and the landscapes you explored. Bring the world to us. Write five blog posts on or shortly after your trip with accompanying photos or short videos detailing your adventures. We’ll devote a week of our blog to showcasing the story of your travels.

We will review all submissions. Please recognize that we may get numerous submissions, which makes it difficult for us to respond to everyone individually. We can respond only to the submissions that we’re considering featuring. Thank you for sharing. Happy writing. And happy traveling!

February 9, 2011

Visiting Museums with Kids

art-museum-children

Growing up in Santa Fe with an artist father, I experienced my fair share of galleries as a child. My dad would drag me along Canyon Road on nights with lots of gallery openings, and my attention would be held for about 0.2 seconds in each space before I got restless. It must have paid off though, as now I love galleries and museums and any opportunity to see art. But how can we help make viewing art, especially in museums, interesting and fun for kids?

Red Tricycle has a great article about visiting San Francisco MOMA with kids. They recommend visiting on Family Days, where there will be other kids to interact with, and signing up for museum tours that are specifically catered to children.

Many museums cater specific programming and events to be kid friendly. You can get information on the following museums below:

SFMOMA – San Francisco

De Young Museum – San Francisco

Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York

Museum of Fine Art – Boston

Museum of Contemporary Art – Chicago

Art Institute of Chicago – Chicago

Walters Art Museum – Baltimore

Baltimore Museum of Art – Baltimore

Getty Museum – Los Angeles

MOCA – Los Angeles

What are you favorite ways to share art with your kids?