Category Archives: Behind the Design

January 25, 2012

Behind the Design: Legong Dancers

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.

Our Celuk Embroidered Top was inspired by the ceremonial necklaces of the Legong dancers.

images credits (clockwise): Tea’s Trip Pictsblogbaliwwwcelebrate life lah!dances of bali

 

Our Balinese Dancer Top and Lengong Dancer Tee were also inspired by the lovely Legong ladies. We loved the style of the paintings we saw in Bali and used that as inspiration for creating these tops. To get the same feel I actually took out my paint and got to painting. See how Bali’s paintings inspired our artful take on the Legong ladies below.

 

Which Legong-inspired design is your favorite? Share with us in the comments section below.

January 20, 2012

Spring Fashion Report: Neon is in!

Spring fashion is filled with pops of neon shades from pinks to greens to purples and yellows.  We saw fashion runways everywhere explode with new ways express this bold statement.

Neon

Photo collage compiled from Pinterest.

We turned on the light and had a bright idea, so we filled our Spring collection with neons for every style. Our neon pink girls leggings will surely excite the fashionistas in your home, while our subtle green neon graphics will fit the cool style of your little guys. Whichever your taste, be sure to electrify your wardrobe with these fluorescent pops of color.

What do you think of the new neon trend? Tell us in the comments section below.

 

January 17, 2012

Behind the Design: Poleng Cloth

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.

As the national color of Bali, poleng, a black and white check design, is one of the most reoccurring patterns our designers saw on their inspiration trip.

They viewed this pattern tied to trees and statues, on sarongs and flags, and more; everywhere they turned, they saw poleng.  They finally asked a police officer clothed in the poleng pattern, why he wore it.  He informed them that he wore it for protection; the black and white checked pattern represents the yin-yang which depicts balance as the pattern always has equal amounts of white to black.

Looking for balance and protection in you child’s wardrobe? We interpreted the poleng pattern in our Spring preview through our boys shorts and girls dresses and skirts.

How would you wear the poleng pattern of balance and protection? Share with us below in the comments section.

December 31, 2011

Quality Children’s Clothes, Soft Children’s Clothes…

We asked: What would you tell a new mom about Tea? And, surprisingly your answers were quite alike, boiling down to the most used adjectives, adverbs, and nouns displayed in the word cloud below.


 

Some of our favorite responses included:

 

“The patterns are original and get the “wow” factor from others .”
“They are comfy and soft and unforgettable for photos”
“Unique, comfortable, adorable, stylish, washes up great, true to size & worth every penny!”
“No other clothing has the kind of comfort, versatility, and style that Tea does.”

 

As we embark on 2012, be sure your child starts the new year in style, in comfort, and in clothes that will last until 2013. Happy New Year!

 

December 28, 2011

Behind the Design: Mexico’s Dragon

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.

While Mexico, doesn’t necessarily have a traditional dragon, per say, it does have some very dragon-like creatures that have become very important to Mexican Culture.

images credits (left to right and top to bottom): Pyramid of Feathered Serpent, Pyramid of the Feathered Serpent, Quetzalcoatl Mosaic by Diego Rivera, Diego Rivera Illustrations, Quetzalcoatl Mosaic Detail, Diego Rivera Illustration

The Feathered Serpent is a dragon-like deity important to many mesoamerican cultures. In Aztec culture he is known as Quetzalcoatl. Like many dragons in Asian cultures, the feathered serpent has a snake-like body, however it is not covered in scales like most other cultures’ dragons.  The feather serpent is covered with feathers, which gives it the ability to fly, even though it does not have wings. [fun fact: the Korean Dragon can also fly and does not have wings] The feathered serpent appeared in many of Diego Rivera’s works (pictured above). Do you recognize the frog in Diego’s mosaic?

mexico dragon shirt

Tea’s Aztec Serpent Shirt

images from inspiration trip photos

Many alebrijes take form as dragons or dragon-like creatures.  I suspect since alebrijes are a modern Mexican craft, crafters were exposed to influences from many different cultures. A dragon is a logical choice for an alebrije since they are usually fantasical creatures.

Tea’s Alebrije Shirt

December 21, 2011

Behind the Design: Highland Holiday Colors

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.

from Tea’s inspiration trip photos

Deep purples, rich blues and pops of bright pink may not scream holiday to everyone, but we loved this festive color palette proudly worn by the people in the village of Chamula. These are the colors of the traditional dress in this region of Chiapas. We were so inspired by the color, we couldn’t even wait till we got home to sport this beautiful palette. One generous women we met even let us try the clothes on that she was wearing. I hope you enjoy wearing them as much as we do.

mexico holiday clothing inspired by chimula

some of the styles from our Highland Holiday collection: girl styles, boy styles, women styles

December 14, 2011

Behind the Design: Lucha Libre Masks

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.


The photo above was taken on our by one of our designers on our Modern Mexico Inspiration trip.

Luche Libre is a Mexican wrestling style characterized by the colorful masks the participants wear. The first Lucha Libre mask was worn as a gimmick in order to excite the audience and develop an alternate persona for the wrestler. Since then, the sport has become defined by the characters and colors the wrestlers’ masks exhibit.

We couldn’t help but include some colorful Lucha Libre masks in our boys graphic tees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share with us in the comments below: what color would your Lucha Libre mask be?

 

December 7, 2011

Behind the Design: La Rana y La Mono Baby Romper

Behind the Design Wednesdays: Every week Tea writes about our designers’ inspiration for our current collection of clothing. Explore all of our Behind the Design posts.

You may be wondering, why does Tea have a frog and a monkey on their baby romper?  Well these two creatures actually represent two famous married Mexican artists, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo.

If you’ve been following our Studio T blog, you’ll know that a lot of our Modern Mexico children’s clothes collection was inspired by the works of Diego and Frida.  Our La Rana Y El Mono baby romper captures our playful tribute to them.

frog drawings and mosaics by Diego Rivera, monkeys from Frida Kahlo’s self portraits

Diego thought he looked like a frog and Frida would often paint monkeys throughout her work.  The artists started to use the Spanish pet names La Rana (frog) and El Mono (monkey) for each other. We think that’s pretty adorable.

How about you?  What are your pet names for your loved ones?

 

December 5, 2011

Tea’s Global Children’s Clothes Donation

On November 28th and 29th, Tea donated one piece of clothing to the Global Fund for Children for every order placed online or at a Tea retailer.  The Global Fund for Children is an organization that helps advance the dignity of at-risk children by supporting and strengthening grass root groups and effectively utilizing media to highlight the disparities experienced by this demographic.

Through your purchases and the help of the Global Fund for Children, Tea was able to donate over 2,500 articles of clothing to the following organizations:

  1. Jamghat- Located in New Delhi, India, Jamghat provides a safe and supportive environment for street children to enable them to evolve physically and emotionally.
  2. Baoji Xinxing-Baoji Xinxing provides rehabilitation, education, recreation, and vocational skills to street children in central China.
  3. Associação Excola-Helping children in the heart of downtown Rio de Janeiro, Associação Excola works to empower youth living on the streets to make long-term positive changes in their lives.
  4. Homeless Children’s Playtime Project-Located in the District of Columbia, Homeless Children’s Playtime Project nurtures healthy child development and reduces the effects of trauma among children living in temporary housing programs.
  5. The Associate of Children and youth with Disabilities- Based in Moldova, this organizations provides direct support for children with multiple disabilities through an annual integration summer camp.
  6. Maison de la Gare St. Louis (MDGSL)- A child-oriented organization located in Senegal that works to promote the social and economic integration of talibés, young boys who are sent by their families to urban areas to study the Qu’ran but often end up being subjected to conditions akin to slavery and forced labor

 

We’re thrilled that our loyal fans helped us award these organizations with such a meaningful donation. Tea Collection supports the Global Fund for Children because they also work to celebrate cultures around the world.   How do you give back? Share your thoughts about charitable giving in the comments section below.

Learn more about Tea’s work with the Global Fund for Children.  Proceeds from our Little Citizens line are donated to the Global Fund for Children.