Tag: Destination: Nordic Design

A Look Back At Where We’ve Been


As we end one year and make our way into another, we’re taking this chance to look back and explore the places our collections have taken us. Tea has made it to over many different countries, met hundreds of caring people, learned how to sing and dance and say hello in countless languages. Most importantly, we’ve gathered all the inspiration along our way to share with you. Here’s a look at some places we’ve gone over the past few years.

Meatballs + Lefse… A Family Tradition

My family is a blend of Scottish, Irish, German and Native American. Our Christmas Eve tradition? A Nordic feast featuring Swedish meatballs and lefse at my Aunt and Uncle’s house. While most meatballs are known to sit on top of spaghetti, these meatballs are piled high onto a hearty serving of mashed potatoes. Lefse is a traditional soft Norwegian flatbread made of potatoes and flour… best served with copious amounts of butter! For the past 20 years, the table has been set with Spode Christmas china, poinsettias, candles and these two staple dishes.

Jessie Bandy Christmas

Music from Around the World

Click here or the image above to open the ‘We Go There’ playlist in Spotify

We thought it would be fun to compile a few songs from a handful of the countries we’ve visited as a way to celebrate the past 11 years. You’ll find everything from traditional Hungarian folk songs to contemporary music from Norway. Now turn it up and start dancing!


Vi Ses Senare Scandinavia!

Highlights from Nordic 2012

It’s that time of year again to say goodbye to our cozy home we have found in destination Nordic.  Thank you for all the wonderful memories, bright colors, and lessons on biking.  We’ve learned a lot from our trip and hope you have too! Finland, Sweden, and Denmark have taught us to notice the beauty in everything from nature, furniture, to the stars shining in the night sky.

DIY: Wintery Scarf

Tea model in diy wintery scarf

Learn how to make this wintery scarf.

Did you see the scarf on page 4 of our Holiday 2012 Catalog and wonder where you could find one of your own? Our prop designer created ours by shredding a rug and twisting the strips together.  You can make one yourself following the steps below.  We bought thick gauge acyclic yarn and used scissors to craft our own scarf.

Skein of Yarn and scissors.

Easiest diy scarf.

1. Unwind the yarn to desired length.  Ours was around 6.5 ft to 7.5 ft long.  We used the entire skein of yarn and had exercise weights as an extra set of hands.  See the picture below.

Yarn measuring using weights.

We used weights to help measure the precise length of yarn.

2. Snip the yarn at half length (where the weight is positioned).
3. Divide the half into 2 even sections.  Start twisting to one side.  Then twist the other half  to the same side (both in or both out).  Then twist both previously twisted sides together.  Tie a knot at the end.

Two hands twisting a scarf.

Twist the halves in the same direction.

4. Repeat for the other side.
5. Twist the 2 twisted halves together and knot it at the end.  Knot where you want the tassels to begin.

A finished twisted scarf.

Our final product- a warm and cozy twisted scarf.

Look how easy it was to twist your own scarf.

*Please note that this activity should be for kids 3 years and up.

Happy twisting!


DIY: Neon Dipped Pine Cones

Here’s a fun twist to pine cones during the holidays.  We thought it would be fun to add a pop of color to our cinnamon scented pine cones.  It’s a guaranteed good time with your kids.  Make sure your child can operate a paint brush and you are in business.

Scissors, pinecone, neon paint, stamp pad

All the supplies you need for neon dipped pine cones.

It’s best to squeeze your paint onto a paper plate for easy application onto your paint brush.

Step 1: Hold the pine cone by the top branch, and apply a generous amount of paint onto your paint brush and dab the edge of the pine cone.  Make sure you get an even coat as this provides for a more vibrant color.  From trial and error, we learned it’s best to start working your way up from the bottom otherwise you’ll end up with neon hand prints all over your furniture.

Step 2: Let it dry overnight.

Step 3: We thought it would be fun to cut name tags from card stock.  We stamped our names on them. These are great placecards for your holiday dinner party or dip a whole bunch of pine cones and display them in a glass vase.  We used them around the office for some holiday pizazz.  The possibilities are endless.

Neon dipped pine cone name cards.

Our finished product!

Share this post with your friends & leave a comment if you try this activity. We’d love to hear about your experience!

Baking Swedish Apple Pie

Guest blogger, Alyson, shares a kid- friendly Swedish Apple Pie recipe with us.

The kids and I whipped up this quick, easy, fun dessert.  Apple pie is a popular dessert in Sweden.  We loved making this crust-less apple pie because the kids could pitch in. Who doesn’t love practicing your counting and getting rewarded with a sweet treat at the end? You can bet they enjoyed each bite of this dessert.  Things always do taste better when you bake it yourself.  Here’s how you and your kids can whip up this recipe in a pinch.


4 – 5 medium apples
1 and ¼ cups sugar
3 teaspoons cinnamon
¾ cup butter
1 cup flour
1 egg

1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
2. Peel the apples and slice them. Put them into a pie pan.

Girl peeling apples.

Peeling apples is a kid-friendly task.

Eric (five-and-a-half) was able to do it by himself, and Abigail (almost four) needed a little assistance. The kids loved this! (Peeling carrots is another favorite activity.)

3. Mix ¼ cup sugar and 3 teaspoons of cinnamon.
4. Sprinkle this mixture over the apples.
5. In a pan, melt the butter and then remove from the heat.
6. Add the remaining ingredients to the butter and mix.
7. Pour evenly over the apples.
8. Bake 45 minutes.

Swedish apple pie.

The finished product. Time to dig in.

Image courtesy of Food.com.
See the full recipe.