Tag Archives: little citizens

November 16, 2010

Words We Don’t Have in English

Graphic-Letterpress-Pieces-SHOP1006-de

 

One of the best things about learning other languages is identifying words that don’t exist in English. My mother teaches English as a foreign language and always has fun exercises for her students on this theme.  This blog post inspired us at Tea last month to start thinking about and collecting our favorite words that exist in other languages, but that don’t have  direct English translations.

Some of our favorites:

Espirit d’escalier (French) Having the perfect comeback (too late).

Pisan zapra: (Malay) The time needed to eat a banana.

Chantepleurer (French) singing at the same time as crying.

Waldeinsamkeit (German) the feeling of being alone in the woods

Pochemuchka (Russian) a person who asks a lot of questions

Gezellig (Dutch) warm, friendly, happy, cozy, in relation to a place.

Meraki (Greek) doing something with soul, creativity, or love

Tingo (Pascuense language of Easter Island) to borrow objects one by one from a neighbour’s house until there is nothing left

Age-otori (Japanese) To look worse after a haircut.

Arigata-meiwaku (Japanese) An act someone does for you that you didn’t want to have them do and tried to avoid having them do, but they went ahead anyway, determined to do you a favour, and then things went wrong and caused you a lot of trouble, yet in the end social conventions required you to express gratitude.

Nito-onna: (Japanese) for a woman so dedicated to her career that she has no time to iron blouses and so resorts to dressing only in knitted tops.

Katy has this story:

My aunt always uses the word: “genare“, an Italian word that technically means “to bring forth”. She uses it to mean “to use something for the first time.” My Italian Uncle’s family always used it that way. I always thought that was a cute word. She doesn’t like “genaring” things and lets them sit in her closet for a long time before using them.

What are your favorite words in other languages that don’t exist in English? Share in the comments below!

October 20, 2010

Kopila Valley Children’s Home

24volunteerism-2-articleLarge

 

 

Every once in a while I come across a story that I find so amazing and inspiring that I can’t stop thinking about it. This morning in the NYTimes I discovered the Kopila Valley School in Surkhet, Nepal. Kopila Vally is a home for orphans and abandoned children in Nepal, as well as a school for children from surrounding villages. It was founded by Maggie Doyne, a native of New Jersey who moved to Nepal when she was 19. She used $5000 that she had saved up from babysitting to lay the foundations for the organization.

kopila 221

 

 

Untitled-1

 

The school started small with just a handful of students, but due in part to a grant from DoSomething.org, has expanded quickly over the past few years. It now has a library and an auditorium, and is working its way up to being able to accommodate high-school age kids.   Along with providing education, the school houses the children, offers them food and health care, and teaches them vocational skills like repairing bicycles and raising livestock.

To learn more about Maggie’s story and how she started the school, click here. For more information on the Kopila Valley Children’s Home, as well as video clips, and to donate, visit their website. To read about Maggie on the NYTimes and learn about the philanthropic work of other women abroad, check out their article on The D.I.Y.  Foreign Aid Revolution.

 

October 14, 2010

Education Levels Around the World

Though we love designing and creating inspired children’s clothing, children’s education is one issue that is always top of mind, as parents and citizens of the world. This is why we continue to support the efforts of The Global Fund for Children, whose mission is to advance the dignity of children and youth around the world.

The graphic below speaks directly to the issue of global education and serves as a reminder of the progress that still needs to be made throughout the world. We hope you find it as interesting as we do and continue to support organizations like the Global Fund for Children and other non-profits that help the little citizens of the world.

(Click Image to Enlarge)

Education Levels Around the World

To add to your blog, copy and paste the HTML code below.

September 23, 2010

Bicikl, Bicicleta, Bicycle, Bicikli

It’s no secret that we love bicycles at Tea.  As a testament to bikes this season we designed our Bicycle Tee, celebrating Bicycles in Croatian, Romanian, English, and Hungarian:

Picture 2

Commuting to and from work in San Francisco has convinced me that biking is the best way to see a city, whether it’s the one you live in now, or a new one entirely. Happily I’m not the only one with that opinion, and now there are bike tour options in almost any country you visit. This 8 day bike tour along the Dalmation Coast in Croatia is top of my adventure destination list, followed by this 7-day tour of Castles in Transylvania.

 

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia

1254685947yyxnMAP

Hunedoara Castle, Transylvania

Winter may be just around the corner, but in most parts of the USA it’s still warm enough to hop on your bike and go for a ride.  We’ll see you out there!

September 8, 2010

Happy International Literacy Day!

colored bookshelf

Today is International Literacy Day! Created by UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) in 1965, International Literacy Day’s goal is to emphasize and celebrate literacy around the world, for all individuals and in all communities. According to UN statistics almost 774 million adults throughout the world have at most only basic reading skills.

Many libraries and community centers around the country use this day as an opportunity to reach out for volunteers to tutor and assist adults and children in improving their reading skills (such as our local San Francisco Library). If you’re in New York City, check out today’s blog post about International Literacy Day, and see how you can get involved.

At Tea we celebrate reading through our Children’s Books. We donate the proceeds from their sale to the Global Fund for Children, which funds grassroots organizations throughout the world, and focuses on promoting education for disadvantaged youth.

If you want to find more ways to contribute to organizations that focus on literacy, here are some useful suggestions.

What were your favorite books when you were a child? What are your favorite books now? Leave a post in the comments below.

May 24, 2010

The Lazy Days of Summer – day 8 of our celebration!

farmers marketJust one week until the unofficial first day of summer. It always makes us feel like a kid again. We remember picking and tasting the season’s first blueberries on our grandparents’ farm, running & laughing through the sprinkler (or hydrant), the sound of crickets at night and of course, the ice cream truck.

To win our 8th $100 birthday certificate…when you were a kid, what did you love about the beginning of summer? Sights, sounds, smells, tastes?  Post on our Facebook page by the end of today for the opportunity to win.  The randomly selected winner will be announced tomorrow.

May 22, 2010

Memorial Day Activities

Thank you for all your great suggestions for where we could go on our next inspiration trip. We wouldn’t be surprised if some of your ideas came to life sooner than you think. A bit closer to home, we’re looking forward to summer in San Francisco, even if it’s a bit chilly, you’ll still see us out and about every weekend on our own adventures. To win today’s $100 birthday certificate, please share on our Facebook page what are you and your kids will be up to this Memorial Day weekend.  The randomly selected winner will be announced tomorrow.sand box

May 20, 2010

Going There – Day 4 of Celebrating!

leigh 2

Thanks for all your wonderful, touching and real stories of what it means for you to bring your kids. So for today, please share some of your favorite activities when you go there (wherever there is) with your kids? At Tea, we love exploring the parks, squares and local markets of cities and villages — it’s a great way to discover and connect with the unique and vibrant day-to-day happenings of a particular place.
To win today’s $100 Tea birthday certificate, please share on our Facebook page what you and your kids like to see and do when you “go there.”