Tag: random acts of inspiration

We took #TEAONTHEROAD to Austin

#TEAONTHEROAD

We packed our bags and took #TEAONTHEROAD to Austin, Texas for the last four days of July. For what feels like years now, we’ve been throwing around the idea of a pop-up shop. We did some research and decided that Austin could be the perfect place to try out this concept. As long time fans of TOMS, we reached out and pitched the idea of setting up shop in their backyard on South Congress for a back-to-school event… you can only imagine how thrilled we hear they were on board!

So, for the first time ever, we took Tea on the road. We packed as much as we could into those four days, and man was it worth it. It was hot, we all were sweaty, but a wonderful time was had by all. From those rainy first days of set-up to the rush of customers that very first morning, #TEAONTHEROAD was full of surprises and we loved every minute of it.

Here, we share a special look at just what happened in Austin. We wish you all could have been there… And we can’t wait to hear where you think we should go next!

Tea Neighborhood Shop at Kid Dynamo

Tea Neighborhood Shop at Kid Dynamo

We talk a lot about going “around the world”, but the other side of this phrase “and across the street” is just as important. We know that being a good citizen (big or little) means being a good neighbor, too.

Local boutiques have always been an integral part of the community. Shopkeepers know their neighbors, greet customers by name, watch babies grow into big kids. This August, we launched our very first Tea Neighborhood Shop at Kid Dynamo in Berkeley, CA. Kid Dynamo has long been a retailer of Tea and we treasure the relationship we have with shop owners, Erin and Holly. Around the world and across the street, neighborhoods are where life happens. And that’s exactly where we want to be. So, what does a Tea Neighborhood Shop look like?

Japanese School Lunches

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Japan is a culture filled with etiquette and customs and this is true no matter your age. In Japan… lunch is much more than a 15 minute free for all. There are lessons to learn here too! Many Japanese school children, like Jiyu, move aside their desks to dust and clean their classroom once a day.

Kanji Activity

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More than 2,000 kanji characters make up the Japanese language, and each character has a meaning as well as a sound. Kanji are used for writing nouns, adjectives, adverbs and verbs. Their beautiful designs are seen throughout Japan, on buildings, signs, in newspapers… everywhere you look! We were mesmerized by not only the beauty of the written kanji, but how each kanji character, when written out, can look like the thing it describes. We’ve put together 6 kanji characters for you to try at home with your little citizens. Download our acitivty sheet and make sure to share you kanji with us!

Kanji

Ramen, Udon, Soba… Oh my!

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Think you’re skilled with chopsticks? Meet Jiyu, our friend in Tokyo who at the young age of 3, has mastered the art. In Japan… ramen, udon and soba are three popular kinds of noodles kids eat throughout the week. Learn more about these yummy noodles and get our recipe for a kid-friendly for ramen, just like the dish we enjoyed in Tokyo. 

All About the Lucky Cat

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If you’ve ever been in a Japanese restaurant or strolled through Japantown or Chinatown in a nearby city, chances are you’ve noticed a little cat statue on a shelf or in a shop window. You may have even noticed that little cat waving it’s paw at you! This little cat figurine, called maneki neko, is a lucky charm that is very popular in Japanese cultures. Maneki neko (or lucky cat) is a talisman that is believed to attract good luck or fortune to those who own one. Here’s what we’ve learned about this good luck charm…

School Lunches in Japan

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As an American stepping into a Japanese public school, you’re bound to notice some differences. Especially at lunch time. Learn how the Japanese public school lunch program, called kyushoku, helps shape students from the very beginning of their schooling.