Tag Archives: travel with kids

May 24, 2011

2 Continents, 3 Countries, 2 Weeks, 3 Children (Part One)

This week we’ll be featuring three posts by guest blogger Kimberly Brambilla. Last summer she and her husband took their three young daughters to 2 Continents and 3 Countries in 2 weeks! This is Part One – stay tuned for Parts Two and Three.

“Are you crazy?” I’ve become used to being asked this question as I’ve planned trips and traveled with my 3 small children.  Having children doesn’t stop me from doing what I love most– in fact having children has actually made me more determined to continue traveling, so that I can share this love with them.  I wish to instill in them a sense of adventure, an openness and appreciation of other peoples and their cultures and a love of exploring the world.

Chiara, Gisele, and Olivia

Last summer we embarked on a journey of a lifetime.  We traveled to Spain, Italy and Morocco.  I knew that traveling with a 7, 5 and 2-year old would present many challenges, but it would also undoubtedly be an incredible experience for my daughters Chiara, Olivia and Gisele.  We were going to Spain to vacation, but were also headed to Italy to spend time with “la familia”.  My husband’s family lives there, and the girls do not get the chance to see them often.  Since Morocco is only 9 miles from Spain I couldn’t pass up the chance to expose my children to a culture very unlike their own.

To prepare and get them excited we read library books about places we would visit, looked at maps, made art projects and learned simple words and phrases in Arabic and Spanish My husband also speaks Italian with the girls, so going to Italy would be an opportunity for them to practice.

With bags and camera packed we were off, and began the adventure in the colorful and vibrant city of Barcelona.  We were thoroughly exhausted after traveling by plane, train and automobile to reach our apartment rental in the city.  After dropping off our luggage, we began the search for a place to eat dinner.  We were so tired that we stopped at the first place we found.  It didn’t look like much, but boy were we surprised!  Chiara wanted to order spaghetti but we reminded her that we were going to try new food on this trip.  Once the paella, green olives, manchego cheese and fresh bread arrived at the table we were 5 very happy travelers.  Although the girls were a little shy about using Spanish words with the waiters, they loved their first Spanish meal.

The next couple of days we toured the city in double-decker buses, which we found was the perfect way to see a city with kids. We saw many of the famous sites such as Sagrada Familia Church, Casa Batllo, Park Guell, and also spent time at the beach.  Our time in Barcelona was short but the memories we made are long lasting.  Next it was time for the girls to experience and learn about their Italian heritage and roots.  Italia here we come!

April 26, 2011

Bike to School Day in San Francisco

April 7th was Bike to School Day in San Francisco. Thousands of kids of all ages rode to school with their parents and teachers, with the goal of reducing carbon emissions, encouraging daily exercise, and to have fun! More than 40 schools participated, making it the largest city-wide Bike to School Day yet.

 

We love that this is a yearly tradition in San Francisco, and although we’re not in school anymore, Tea is looking forward to Bike to Work Day on May 12th.

 

April 18, 2011

Studio T is looking for Foreign Correspondents

Above, Tea explores Korea, Mexico, and Spain

 

At Tea we are all about bringing the world home. Each season we visit a different global destination, and share our inspiration and the stories of our travels. We are appreciative of the beauty we find and the countries we explore. We’re cultural adventurists, apparel designers and global travelers. We believe in the journey. In discovery. In caring and connection. In diving in. In experiencing life with every bit of our souls. We go there. Across the globe. And across the street.

And now we want to hear about YOUR adventures. We’re on the hunt for three Foreign Correspondents to share their experiences with us on our blog Studio T, between now and the end of the year.

If you and your children are traveling internationally in the near future, write to us! Email blog@teacollection.com and describe the trip you’re planning on taking. Tell us:

– Where you are going, and for how long

– What the purpose of your trip is – is it to experience a specific culture, reconnect with family roots, or do community service?

– How you plan on maximizing your travel experience with your children along the way

Before you leave we’ll give you a $500 Gift Certificate to fill your suitcase with travel clothes from Tea.

Once you return, share your stories and photographs of the people you’ve met, the food you ate, the fashion you saw, and the landscapes you explored. Bring the world to us. Write five blog posts on or shortly after your trip with accompanying photos or short videos detailing your adventures. We’ll devote a week of our blog to showcasing the story of your travels.

We will review all submissions. Please recognize that we may get numerous submissions, which makes it difficult for us to respond to everyone individually. We can respond only to the submissions that we’re considering featuring. Thank you for sharing. Happy writing. And happy traveling!

February 9, 2011

Visiting Museums with Kids

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Growing up in Santa Fe with an artist father, I experienced my fair share of galleries as a child. My dad would drag me along Canyon Road on nights with lots of gallery openings, and my attention would be held for about 0.2 seconds in each space before I got restless. It must have paid off though, as now I love galleries and museums and any opportunity to see art. But how can we help make viewing art, especially in museums, interesting and fun for kids?

Red Tricycle has a great article about visiting San Francisco MOMA with kids. They recommend visiting on Family Days, where there will be other kids to interact with, and signing up for museum tours that are specifically catered to children.

Many museums cater specific programming and events to be kid friendly. You can get information on the following museums below:

SFMOMA – San Francisco

De Young Museum – San Francisco

Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York

Museum of Fine Art – Boston

Museum of Contemporary Art – Chicago

Art Institute of Chicago – Chicago

Walters Art Museum – Baltimore

Baltimore Museum of Art – Baltimore

Getty Museum – Los Angeles

MOCA – Los Angeles

What are you favorite ways to share art with your kids?

February 3, 2011

Wild Parrots of San Francisco and Barcelona

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photo by Gerry Caps

One of our local tourist attractions in San Francisco are the parrots of Telegraph Hill.  Feral and free-flying, these Cherry-Headed Conures are often seen (and heard!) in flocks over Coit Tower and the North Beach neighborhood.  Originally from Peru and Ecuador, these parrots are believed to be descendants of escaped or released pets. In 2004 there was a film made about them, titled The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill.

Another flock of wild parrots can be found in Park Guell, in Barcelona Spain. A gorgeous park filled with architecture by Gaudi and rolling gardens, it also is home to a large flock of Monk Parakeets.

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images clockwise: Tea’s Travel Photos, Trude, Tea’s Travel Photos, DJ’s Photography

The parrots and tile mosaics of Park Guell inspired our designers to create our Perico Mosaic top:

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Have you encountered any flocks of wild urban parrots on your travels?

January 27, 2011

The Horses of Spain

Horses have been an important part of Spain’s culture, agriculture, military, and sport for hundreds of years. However Spain’s most famous breed of horse would have to be the Andalusian.

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Engraving of Andalusian, 1743

 

The breed was developed in the Iberian Penninsula in the 15th century, and was originally used as war horses to carry warriors during battle. They were eventually replaced by sturdier, larger horses who could carry men in armor, and since then have become sport horses, doing anything from dressage to bull-fighting.

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This Spring we celebrated Spain’s love of horses with our Caballo Graphic Tee, inspired by the cubist art movement and Picasso’s horses:

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December 31, 2010

A Global New Year

We have our own New Year’s traditions in the USA. In almost every major city there is a grand firework display. People gather around their TVs to watch the ball drop in Times Square, and champagne is the drink of choice. We have hats and glasses, noisemakers and confetti. In many parts of the USA eating black eyed peas is rumored to bring you good luck, and they’re often served with collard greens and pork or ham. We make resolutions for the New Year, and kiss each other at midnight.

But what are other countries’ traditions around this date?

Japan

At midnight on January 1st, Buddhist temples across Japan ring their bells 108 times, to ward off the 108 sins in Buddhist belief. Traditional food on this date is a dish of seaweed, fish cakes, mashed sweet potato, burdock root, and sweetened black soybeans, called osechi, as well as kagami mochi, which are rice cakes topped with oranges. Postcards are sent to friends and family celebrating the New Year, and haiku poetry is celebrated with themes of new beginnings.

Kagami-mochi

Mexico

In Mexico it’s traditional to eat 12 grapes at the chimes of midnight, making a wish with each one. Houses are decorated in the color red, and wishes are made for the New Year. In Mexico City the New Year celebrations occur in Zocalo, which is the main large plaza of the city.

7-Grapes_Champagne400

Finland

In Finland there is an old New Year’s eve tradition that involves dropping hot pieces of tin into cold buckets of water. The shape that they assume can be interpreted as indications of the New Year. Different shapes have different meaning, signifying wealth, happiness, sickness,  sorrow, and love.

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Scotland

Scotland has a New Year’s Eve tradition referred to as “first-footing”. The first-footer is the first person to cross the threshold and enter a house in the New Year. Signifying a bearer of good luck, the first footer (often young and dark-haired) carries with them a coin, bread, salt, whisky, or coal, depending on what the family is wishing for in the New year.

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Panama

Panama celebrates the New Year by the burning of Muñecos, effigies of celebrities or politicians during bonfire parties. Contests are held as to who has the best muñeco.  The burning of muñecos is believed to fight off evil spirits in preparation for a new year.

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Let’s say Happy New Year! in:

Gleðilegt nýtt ár! (Icelandic)

Bonne Annee!  (French)

Feliz Ano-Nuevo! (Spanish)

Blwyddyn Newydd Dda! (Welsh)

Gelillog Nieuwjaar! (Dutch)

Sretna Nova Godina (Croatian)

Sawadee Pee Mai (Thai)

And from all of us at Tea – Best Wishes for a very happy New Year!

December 29, 2010

Count to Ten in Spanish

 

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(artwork by gracehesterdesigns)


1. Uno  2. Dos  3. Tres 4. Cuatro 5. Cinco 6. Seis  7. Siete  8. Ocho  9. Nueve  10. Diez

 

 

On the theme of numbers, have a look at our Cubist Stripe Tee and Romper this season – do you know a little Numero Uno?

numero 2

 

 

For more numbers posts check out Count to Ten in Hungarian.

November 18, 2010

The Lion on Széchenyi Chain Bridge

The_Chain_Bridge

The Széchenyi Chain Bridge in Budapest spans the Danube river, connecting the Western and Eastern  parts of the city. Opened in 1849, the bridge is named after Count István Széchenyi, who financially and politically supported its construction. Made of beautifully intricate wrought iron, the bridge was greatly damaged during the Siege of Budapest during World War II , and was partly rebuilt.

While exploring Budapest our designers came across a magnificent lion gracing the abutments at the end of the bridge.

4320749-Lion_Statue_on_the_Chain_Bridge-Budapest

He is a smaller stone replica of the famous bronze Trafalgar lions, guarding Nelson’s Column in London. and was installed on the bridge in 1852. Inspired by his noble features, our designers created this stylish shirt:

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Know any little lions in your life? You can find this shirt here.

 

November 16, 2010

Words We Don’t Have in English

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One of the best things about learning other languages is identifying words that don’t exist in English. My mother teaches English as a foreign language and always has fun exercises for her students on this theme.  This blog post inspired us at Tea last month to start thinking about and collecting our favorite words that exist in other languages, but that don’t have  direct English translations.

Some of our favorites:

Espirit d’escalier (French) Having the perfect comeback (too late).

Pisan zapra: (Malay) The time needed to eat a banana.

Chantepleurer (French) singing at the same time as crying.

Waldeinsamkeit (German) the feeling of being alone in the woods

Pochemuchka (Russian) a person who asks a lot of questions

Gezellig (Dutch) warm, friendly, happy, cozy, in relation to a place.

Meraki (Greek) doing something with soul, creativity, or love

Tingo (Pascuense language of Easter Island) to borrow objects one by one from a neighbour’s house until there is nothing left

Age-otori (Japanese) To look worse after a haircut.

Arigata-meiwaku (Japanese) An act someone does for you that you didn’t want to have them do and tried to avoid having them do, but they went ahead anyway, determined to do you a favour, and then things went wrong and caused you a lot of trouble, yet in the end social conventions required you to express gratitude.

Nito-onna: (Japanese) for a woman so dedicated to her career that she has no time to iron blouses and so resorts to dressing only in knitted tops.

Katy has this story:

My aunt always uses the word: “genare“, an Italian word that technically means “to bring forth”. She uses it to mean “to use something for the first time.” My Italian Uncle’s family always used it that way. I always thought that was a cute word. She doesn’t like “genaring” things and lets them sit in her closet for a long time before using them.

What are your favorite words in other languages that don’t exist in English? Share in the comments below!