Tag Archives: travel

June 29, 2012

The Maasai Jumping Celebration

We’re introducing guest blogger Pam Geller, a freelance marketing consultant, who traveled to Nairobi, Kenya with her three kids, Kayla | 7 yrs, Drew | 6 yrs, and Jenna | 3 yrs, who just happened to be wearing Tea on their trip.

Travel with Kids to Maasai Kraal

When we visited our tour guide Daniel’s Kraal (Maasai rural village, visible in the background of the photos above), we were invited to witness their lion dance which includes jumping.

Travel with kids Jumping Tradition with Maasai

Maasai jumping is a tradition done at celebrations like a wedding.  The highest jumper gets the most ladies (of course)! They were kind enough to invite us to try. Check out of the video of us taking part in the Maasai jumping tradition.

 


 

June 28, 2012

A Visit to the Maasai Kraal

We’re introducing guest blogger Pam Geller, a freelance marketing consultant, who traveled to Nairobi, Kenya with her three kids, Kayla | 7 yrs, Drew | 6 yrs, and Jenna | 3 yrs, who just happened to be wearing Tea on their trip.

 

Travel with kids to Maasai Village in Nairobi, Kenya

It was incredible to visit a Maasai “village” located in Nairobi, Kenya.  A “Kraal”(“Kraal” — krôl, kräl) is a rural village, where a Maasai family lives, their huts in a circular area, to protect their livestock at night. Our Safari guide, Daniel,  took us to see his family’s Kraal. Daniel’s family consists of one dad, seven moms, and 70 brothers and sisters.  WOW!  Yes- 70 brothers and sisters.  Only Daniel and Daniel’s brothers with their respective wives and children live in the village we visited.  After the brothers showed us their lion dance and how high they can jump, we were invited to go inside their village and see how they live.

Water…no aquifer; they get their water from nearby lakes and streams.

Food…no grocery stores; they crop their own food by hand, in dessert conditions…(mind you…)

Eating utensils…no forks; they gather around a large bowl of food set on the ground and scoop up the food with their fingers or with pieces of bread.

Fire…no matches; they make fire the old fashion way with sticks and elephant poo!

Homes…no brick and mortar; they build their home with mud, sticks, cow dung and cow urine!

Wealth…no money; they measure wealth in terms of cattle and children.

Medicine…no hospitals; they use the urine of animals.  It is thought that the urine of animals is holy and that if used in the right way it can cure sickness.

American Girl with Massi villager

To see how they live in comparison to us, well, was inspiring and humbling.  Amazingly our oldest daughter, Kayla, who is 7, got it.  Here is a passage from her journal that she kept on our trip, “People are poor in Africa.  Okay, when we were driving in the Maasai Mara, we stopped at a village, we saw how the Maasai people live, and their house is made of cow poop and sticks. The girls have to make their houses and it takes three months and they don’t have shoes they are barefoot. “

 

May 30, 2012

Eating in Hong Kong

To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Michelle, a graphic designer at Tea, recently returned from a trip to Hong Kong. She is a foodie at heart and couldn’t wait to share her favorite Asian fish dishes on our Studio T blog.

Coming to Hong Kong feels like coming home. Being able to see my family and come back to the place that I grew up in is both exciting and comforting. Luckily I make a trip there every 5 years, but it never ceases to amaze me how much Hong Kong changes every single time I come back.

Traveling in Hong Kong

Michelle outside of Hung Kee Seafood Restaurant

I travel to Hong Kong to visit family, eat delicious local foods, and to shop. The one place that is a must for me to visit is Hung Kee Seafood Restaurant in Sai Kung. It is where you can get the freshest seafood possible. It is located along the water, and the fisherman sell the seafood right off the boat.

Traveling in Hong Kong

If you want it cooked, you can step into one of the many restaurants located along the edge of the water. The fish tanks are huge, and have such an exotic variety. You pick the seafood that you want from the tanks and they bag it for you right away and ask you how you want it served.

Traveling in Hong KongTraveling in Hong Kong

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can fry it, sauté it, steam it, or have it sashimi style. Here are my recommendations below:

I highly recommend the Geoduck sashimi style. The meat is sweet yet slightly briny. It’s so fresh, you can really taste the difference.

Geoduck sashimi style

Geoduck Sashimi Style

The Pissing Shrimp is another must. It is native to this region and the meat is a cross between shrimp and lobster. We had it fried with
garlic and peppers.

Pissing Shrimp

Pissing Shrimp

The Razor Clams were another crowd pleaser. We had ours sauteed in a black bean sauce. Sweet and crunchy, it is a heartier than the average clam, but possess a clean flavor.

Razor Clams

Razor Clams

Steamed prawns are always a must. The soy sauce with jalapenos compliment the sweetness of the shrimp perfectly.

 

Steamed Prawns

Steamed Prawns

Miniature abalone sauteed in oyster sauce provided a very meaty and satisfying flavor and had a sweet finish.

 

Miniature Abalone
Miniature Abalone

Gigantic Tiger Prawns baked in garlic butter. Do I really need to say more?

 

Gigantic Tiger Prawns

Gigantic Tiger Prawns

 

ENJOY!

May 21, 2012

Discovering Fashion in Paris

To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Ana, who works in Tea’s creative department, recently returned from a trip to Paris. Check out her adventures!

When I’m in Paris to visit my family, I make it a habit to take one afternoon to go by myself to explore a museum exhibit. More often than not, I end up at the museum of Les Arts Decoratifs – Mode et Textile. The two floors dedicated to fashion seem pretty small at first but never let down.

This time the exhibit was on Louis Vuitton and Marc Jacobs. Marc Jacobs has been the creative director at Louis Vuitton since 1997 and is head designer for Marc Jacobs as well as Marc by Marc Jacobs. In 2010, he made Time’s list for the 100 most influential people in the world.

I had never looked at these brands’ beginnings so the exploration through the world of Vuitton the malletier was a treat. From the perfect wardrobe display to the development of the trademark print, it caught me by surprise that his creations have been around since 1854.

Louis Vuitton Exhibit at the Museum of Les Arts Decoratifs – Mode et Textile.

On my way up to the Marc Jacobs’ part of the exhibit, the mood changed from classic to black and loud. The displays had all the Marc Jacobs’ design aesthetic but still held on to the Vuitton tradition in a special way. Even the Spring dresses that were all about pastels fashioned in candy store ads, looked right at home in the black environment.

Pastel Dress at Museum Exhibit

Just for fun I ended my visit to the museum stopping by the special exhibit: The History of Babar. I noticed that I was the only adult that wasn’t toting children through this exhibit.  However, I believe spending a little bit of time in the children’s world was just what I needed to start sketching again and looking at life with different eyes for the rest of the trip.

 

May 3, 2012

Snorkeling in Mexico

To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Laura, who works in Product Development, recently returned from a trip to Mexico. Check out her adventure below!

I turned 30 in January. To celebrate my husband and I went to Tulum, Mexico.  It was amazing!

I’m not one for tours, but we had a photographer/guide along with us one day and it was awesome. He showed us some of the best places to swim and snorkel in the area. He led the way and showed us the best path to take through the water and where the best spots were for pictures. At the end of the day, we had a disc full of memories to take with.

We started at at Dos Ojos, which is a Cenote, or freshwater sink hole. The water is around 30 feet deep and the cavern walls are covered with stalactite and stalagmite formations. There is very little light, but in some areas the sunlight filters in, giving it a magical and spooky feeling. The water is beautiful, clear and filled with small fish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

At Akumal Bay we swam with turtles and rays.

Akuma Bay Turtle in Mexico

We also swam around a lagoon called Yal-Ku. The water was warm and there were so many fish it felt like swimming in a fish tank!

November 21, 2011

Vacationing in Barcelona & Discovering Tea

To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Margaret, who works in planning & operations, recently returned from a trip to Barcelona. Check out her adventures!

Usually when I go on vacation, it’s about relaxing and enjoying my time – and getting away from work for a bit! However, on my recent vacation to Spain, I couldn’t help but be reminded of Tea on a daily basis.  Everywhere I went,  I saw something that reminded me of our Catalonia Collection from last spring!

On my first morning in Barcelona, I stepped out the subway right next to La Sagrada Familia Basilica (pictured below). I recognized it immediately – cranes and all – from our Construccion Graphic Boys Tee.  I soon discovered that Gaudi’s idea of a church was much different from other cathedrals that I’ve visited in Europe. The inside reminded me of a colorful, whimsical forest, with trees holding up the roof, and light streaming in through a myriad of stained glass windows.

La Sagrada Familia BasilicaLa Sagrada Familia Basilica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was only the beginning of a series of Gaudi masterpieces that I discovered in Barcelona.  I visited La Pedrera – a residential building built by Gaudi for a wealthy client.  In La Pedrera,  I saw the hanging chain sculpture that Gaudi used, which was featured in a picture in our Spring catalog.

I also discovered the beautiful tile work by Luis Montaner at the Palau de la Musica and the Sant Pau hospital. This tile work inspired the Montaner Flora girls top, the super popular El Palau Tile shift girls dress, and several other of the mosaic-style tops from Spring.

Palua de la Musica

On my last day in Barcelona, it was unusually warm and sunny as I visited Park Guell.  I was immediately drawn to the giant mosaic lizard at the entrance.  Again- I thought of our graphic boys tees with the mosaic-inspired animals and bright colors.

Park Guell Mosaic Lizard

It was a fantastic trip, and wish it could have lasted longer…but I eventually had to return to Fall 2011 (Mexico) and go back to work.  Thanks to Tea for helping sponsor my trip abroad!

November 8, 2011

Ich Liebe Berlin! Isabelle’s Adventures in Berlin

To help everyone at Tea “go there,” we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Isabelle, who works in tech design, recently returned from a trip to Berlin. Check out her adventures!

Ich Liebe Berlin!
I knew that I would like Berlin when I got there but didn’t realize I would end up loving it so much. I had no idea that I could wind up feeling a tad jealous that my city wasn’t as cool. I didn’t know what to expect knowing its gloomy history but to my surprise it was incredibly colorful, inviting, hip, and full of tasty, not to mention inexpensive treats! It was only 22 years ago that the wall fell and the city has since then transformed itself into this Mecca for artists, designers, technology geeks  and of course Techno lovers! I felt welcome there and free to sit back, open up a container and enjoy the scenery.

Berlin Wall remnant at the East Side Gallery

So many inspiring quotes littered the city. I know I was on vacation but I couldn’t have felt more liberated there.

The walls were alive with art and graffiti everywhere I walked. Graffiti felt welcome as artistic expression more than a nuisance as it is viewed in other cities I’ve visited. From full on murals that were sky high to tiny scribbles on the wall, I don’t recall seeing much painted over.

Throngs of people show up every week at Mauer Park to get in on some Karaoke action. I wonder if anyone has ever sang a song by Berlin in Berlin?

Berlin style beer was as colorful as its people! Hanging out at a beer garden was a must while in Berlin. My favorite was the Biergarten at the Tiergarten. The pretzels were hot out of the oven and the mustard was the best I’ve ever had.

Flea Market fodder on Sundays at Mauer Park.

Photobooths were scattered everywhere in the city. The fact that I could capture a moment with my friends on a whim felt very exciting to me.

Art Gallery visit at Direktorenhaus to see a show by one of my favorite Swiss artist duos, Husmann/Tschaeni. I just happened to be there while they were in town for the weekend and met up with them for a drink on the canal. I couldn’t have been happier to meet the artists behind the art which so inspires me.

Sunset on the platform. The time has come to say Tschuss! (German for See ya!)  Don’t you worry Berlin, I plan on visiting you again.

October 10, 2011

Jess’s Adventures in Bali [Part 1]

To help everyone at Tea go there, we make a yearly contribution to each employee for international travel and exploration. Upon their return, our Tea travelers write blog posts to share their adventures with all of us (and the world).

Welcome to part 1 of Jess’s Bali adventures. Let’s go there!

Whenever I travel, I really enjoy going on runs as a way to explore a new place and orient myself. My trip to Bali, Indonesia was no different. After arriving at the beautiful Villa Santai where I would stay while in Tenah Merah, Ubud, I put on my running shoes and left to go check out some nearby villages. I had no idea that a casual run would turn into such an adventure.

I started uphill through a village filled with temples, homes, and snack stands.

There were also a few stray dogs lining the streets. I had been warned about Balinese stray dogs and the recent case of rabies that had been reported on the island. I had been advised to carry a stone or stick with me to throw at them, as this would surely scare them away. Although I try to avoid confrontations with animals, especially stray, untrained ones, I thought it best to carry a little stick with me just in case.

As I made my way uphill, I pondered how beautiful the day was. The sun was shining on the rice fields on either side of me.

The hot, tropical air felt lovely as I ran past. I waved hello to a group of children, smiled at the lady running the snack stand, and greeted an old man passing by with “Selamat Pagi!” (Good Morning).

Then, in the next moment, I came across a large pack of dogs in the path ahead of me. Instantly, I thought to myself, remain calm, no worries. Sing ken ken! But then I noticed a few ears perk up and several heads rise. A couple of them stood up and faced me.

Now I’m scared. They started to approach. I glanced around at the villagers, with a worried, helpless look on my face. That’s when they started to bark at me. At this point, I realized that I had completely stopped moving. I swatted my lame little stick around a few times, accomplishing nothing.

Finally, a little old lady came up to me and scared the pack of dogs off with a shout and a few swoops of her hand. She then came upto me and took the little stick from my hand. She chuckled, mumbled something at me in Balinese, trying to communicate that if I swat at the dogs, they grow more aggressive, thinking I am trying to attack them. She patted me on the back and sent me off, meanwhile still warding off the dogs for me as I made my way through the village. I thanked her, “Terri makahse bankyak!”, and carried on uphill, away from the village.

I would learn later that the Balinese believe stray dogs are re-incarnated ancestors and family members who have behaved badly. That is why they are treated so poorly by the locals.

As I continued up the road, I heard a big commotion. I noticed a little soccer field, so I made my way toward the voices to see what was happening there. I saw a few kids playing soccer, but looking beyond, I noticed a large group of people gathered. I made my way there, curious to see what was taking place. As I got closer, I saw it was a rooster fight. Even though I am vegetarian and also dislike violence between animals, especially for sport, I decided to put judgment aside and check out the tournament. What I saw was better than what I had anticipated. It seemed like every man in the village had joined.

Each male had a pet fighting rooster. They’d wait around, and then enter their rooster into the main fight. There were a few little kids there with their dads, but no women. I was the only woman there, dressed in a pair of running shoes, shorts, a workout shirt and an iPod. I thought they would shoo/send me away, but they were quite welcoming.

After a little while, I moved on and continued my run, only to encounter even more dogs. This time, my village lady friend was not there to help me. I panicked a little until I saw a group of bicyclists approaching. They saw the look of terror on my face and said, “Run with us!” So I started running and they surrounded me in a protective circle of bicycles as we passed by the rabid dogs. It was fun!

The return trip was no less exciting. The locals were burning their fields, blocking the road with dense smoke. Fortunately, a number of them helped me around the smoke by showing me where I could run through some rice fields.

I also managed to dart into a few homes whose owners had left the front door open. Balinese homes tend to be a collection of smaller buildings in a courtyard. There are living quarters along with a small open-air temple people build in their homes. I got a few laughs from some of the women and kids, smiled, and continued my adventure.

At one point, I started missing the bicycle gang. Instead, a man from the village had me run alongside him as he made his way through the dog packs on his scooter. That resulted in a good workout. Again I thanked him, and he responded “sama-sama” (you’re welcome).

When I returned to the villa, my friends asked me how my run was. I replied simply, “It was good!” . . .And jumped straight into the pool.

September 20, 2011

Eva’s Journey to Australia

Every year Tea employees receive a dividend from Tea to use towards international travel. On Studio T we’ll be sharing travel stories of our employees as they travel around the world. This post is by Eva, who traveled to Australia with her family.

You can’t miss the marsupials, birds, reptiles, insects, and aboriginal art when you go to Australia. The country’s ecosystem supports a wide variety of wildlife, and Eva committed herself to photographing as many animals as she could on her vacation. Most of these photos were taken at the Wild Life Park on the Gold Coast, which is located on the Eastern side of the continent.

I need to sleep, please be quiet!

Guess how many colors are on me?

It's too high for me to jump!

I can eat tons of fish.

Wake up. Uncle crocodile is here.

Eva's son Simon, wrapped up in a very real-looking snake!

We love sharing our travel stories with you. Learn more about our journeys by reading about Ana and Nuala’s recent vacations. Interested in sharing your travel stories with us? Learn about becoming a Foreign Correspondent.

 

September 16, 2011

Foreign Correspondents: Traveling with Children

Our second  Foreign Correspondent has returned from her travels! Stacy, her husband, and her two children traveled to Istanbul and Jerusalem this summer. We outfitted them with a suitcase full of Tea before they left, asking them to share their adventures with us upon their return. Below is the final part 5 of their adventure.

The best part of our trip is being reunited with our family and friends.  Of course, my husband was born and raised in Jerusalem, so his ties run deep.  And I worked in Gaza and the West Bank and lived Ramallah for several years, so it’s a bit of a coming home for me too.

When we visit now, because they are older, our kids can play with their new cousins (more and more every year) and our friends’ kids.  It’s fun to watch their friendships deepen each year.  It’s also a great opportunity for them to work on their Arabic.

There is so much joy as we travel and spend time with our family.  But there are difficulties.  I would be remiss to not mention them too.  One of the more difficult aspects of our trip is now that our son is seven, he is aware of the situation around us.  He can’t help but notice the deteriorating political conditions and occupation surrounding him.  It’s difficult to explain to him why we are pulled to the side at the airport for exhaustive questioning, why soldiers took his cousins – the bride and groom in full wedding attire – to a police station on the way to their own wedding, why there is a 25 foot high wall separating long standing Palestinian neighborhoods in half and long detours to get to a checkpoint to wait in line to be allowed to cross through.  And then he asks why we can cross through the wall but so many of our friends and family cannot (we can because of our US passports but some of our friends and family cannot because they hold West Bank IDs which does not allow crossing from one side of the wall to the other).  It’s difficult for an adult to comprehend this, but it is impossible for the children.

Police holdup on the way to the wedding.

One evening, we were driving, and we heard the adhan, or Muslim call to prayer, over a loudspeaker.  It’s beautiful and haunting at the same time.  Our son asked about it, and I explained that many people say a prayer when they hear this call each day.  He asked what they pray for.  I sat kind of bewildered, trying to think of something to say and, before I had a chance, he answered his own question, “Maybe they’re praying for freedom and justice and friendship.”  I think he’s exactly right.

It’s interesting and sad (and inevitable) to see the time your child first becomes aware that not everyone lives a carefree life.  This is true for many, many people wherever you live, of course.  But for him to not just see but to also feel such glaring disparity and question it at such a young age makes me sad for him because a piece of his innocence is lost, but proud too because he is an aware and sensitive and thinking person.

Our hope for tomorrow is a more just and livable life for the entire region.  It will take leadership and bold steps and pragmatism which has been sorely lacking for decades.   In the meantime, we will savor our lasting memories of the good times had, the love of our family, and the eager anticipation of next summer’s adventures.

Our Foreign Correspondent program is ongoing. If you’re interested in sharing your family’s international adventures with us you can find out more here.